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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Avon in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

The Farmington Canal in Avon

 
 
The Farmington Canal in Avon Marker image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, November 3, 2013
1. The Farmington Canal in Avon Marker
Inscription. In 1829 the Farmington Canal opened in Avon and operated until 1847. The Markers, here and across the street, show where it crossed the Albany Turnpike, now Rt. 44. They are made of the same sandstone used in in the Farmington Canal construction.
 
Erected 2012.
 
Location. 41° 48.55′ N, 72° 49.8′ W. Marker is in Avon, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is on Albany Turnpike (U.S. 44), on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5 East Main Street, Avon CT 06001, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Constitution Oak (within shouting distance of this marker); Avon (approx. ľ mile away); Avon Veterans Monument (approx. ľ mile away); Charter Oak descendant (approx. 0.3 miles away); 1st Company Governor's Horse Guards (approx. 1.6 miles away); Birthplace of Wilford Woodruff (approx. 2Ĺ miles away); Roderick A. White M.D. (approx. 2.8 miles away); Weatogue Soldiersí Memorial (approx. 2.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Avon.
 
Also see . . .
1. Farmington Canal Plaque Dedication. (Submitted on February 2, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
2. Farmington Canal text and Trail map in Avon
Hungry for history image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, November 3, 2013
2. Hungry for history
If you are hungry for Farmington Canal history, you have to come to Avon, CT. The Farmington Canal was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1985.
. (Submitted on February 2, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
3. photo #8 is of the Thompson Brook Culvert on the Canal Trail in Avon (1984). (Submitted on February 2, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Canal Barge
Years ago I worked in a building on Rte 44 near the canal. I was told that the building had been the Avon Library in years past (pre-1990). Behind the library and a little to the west there was an old barge sitting unattended on a lot. It was said to have been used on the canal. Is this true? Is the barge still there? I can't find it (or the library building) on google earth. Is there a story behind it? Thanks for your help.
    — Submitted March 31, 2017, by Mike Kelly of Tampa, Florida.

 
Categories. Waterways & Vessels
 
The Albany Turnpike went over the Farmington Canal. image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, November 3, 2013
3. The Albany Turnpike went over the Farmington Canal.
The duplicate sandstone marker is across the Albany Turnpike to the left of the sidewalk. On the right is the Avon Historical Society.
The Canal had a big role in Avonís history. image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, November 3, 2013
4. The Canal had a big role in Avonís history.
In 1835, the 10 hour trip from Avon to New Haven cost $1.75.
Avonís Farmington Canal Trail image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, January 11, 2016
5. Avonís Farmington Canal Trail
This trail in Avon could be the best in Connecticut for experiencing the size of the Farmington Canal. Most trails follow the towpath next to the canal, so you see the canal, but from the viewpoint of the tow animal. This trail, which has been cleared of trees, puts you in the canal. Walking in the middle of the canal you can experience itís size. The canal was built wide enough for 2 boats to pass each other. When you walk at 4 mph, you will be traveling at the speed of a canal boat.
Satellite map of Avonís Farmington Canal Trail image. Click for full size.
By Alan M. Perrie, January 11, 2016
6. Satellite map of Avonís Farmington Canal Trail
Park on the east side of Tillotson Road just before the stop sign at Old Farms Road. The yellow blazed trail starts on the west side, north of the bridge. At 0.4 miles, after going over the towpath, take a left into the almost 200 year old Farmington Canal. Take care crossing the Thomson Brook Culvert, since it is starting to show its age. Walk south for 0.8 miles in the middle of the Farmington Canal. Experience the size of the canal and note the very level towpath on your left (east). To the right is a large deposit of glacial till which was used to build the towpath. If you see the silo for the Sub Edge Farm, you need to turn around. The future plan is to continue the trail around Sub Edge Farm to join the Farmington Canal Trail in Farmington.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 24, 2017. This page originally submitted on February 2, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. This page has been viewed 261 times since then and 72 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 2, 2016, by Alan M. Perrie of Unionville, Connecticut. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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