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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Edward in Washington County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Northeast Bastion

 
 
Northeast Bastion Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 13, 2008
1. Northeast Bastion Marker
Inscription.
Near here was
Northeast Bastion
part of outworks
Fort Edward
1755

 
Erected 1927 by New York State.
 
Location. 43° 15.886′ N, 73° 34.988′ W. Marker is in Fort Edward, New York, in Washington County. Marker is on Lakes to Locks Passage (U.S. 4), on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is on Route 4 between Moon Street and Edward Street. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Edward NY 12828, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Fort Edward (here, next to this marker); Old Moat (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Old Fort Edward (about 400 feet away); The Island (about 500 feet away); Rogers Island (approx. 0.2 miles away); Progenitors of Independence (approx. 0.2 miles away); Major Robert Rogers (approx. 0.2 miles away); Gen. Washington (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Edward.
 
Categories. Colonial EraForts, CastlesMilitaryWar, French and IndianWar, US Revolutionary
 
Fort Edward Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 13, 2008
2. Fort Edward Marker
Fort Edward was the last of three forts built in this area, dating back to 1709.
Old Moat of Fort Edward image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 13, 2008
3. Old Moat of Fort Edward
These are the remains of the old moat that was part of the outworks of Fort Edward. They are located a short distance from the marker.
Site of Old Fort Edward image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 13, 2008
4. Site of Old Fort Edward
The actual site of Old Fort Edward is located not far from the marker. The murder near here of Loyalist Jane McCrea by an Indian allied with British Gen. John Burgoyne created a backlash that resulted in Burgoyne's defeat in Saratoga in 1777.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 17, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,177 times since then and 26 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on July 17, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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