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Pittsburgh in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Hazelwood: A Rivertown Rich in History

 
 
Hazelwood: A Rivertown Rich in History Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, April 19, 2016
1. Hazelwood: A Rivertown Rich in History Marker
Inscription. Named for the hazelnut trees that once grew on the banks of the Monongahela River, Hazelwood possessed a natural beauty that George Washington noted in his early journals. Originally Native American territory, Hazelwood was purchased through the 1758 Stanwix Treaty.

The treaty made way for Scottish Immigrants, who settled in the area of Hazelwood that became known as Scotch Bottom. The first settlers paved a dirt path into Pittsburgh's downtown. Travel on this important throughway, later called Second Avenue, flourished during the mid-1800s. Meanwhile, the Baltimore and Ohio (B&O) Railroad was built along the Monongahela and the Jones and Laughlin Steel Corporation (J&L) opened the Eliza Plant between Bates Street and Greenfield Avenue. Both entities brought industry and prosperity to Scotch Bottom.

In 1871, the B&O purchased the Pittsburgh and Connellsville Railroad, allowing access from Hazelwood to Pittsburgh's now booming downtown. During the 1880s, a roundhouse for repairing locomotives was built while J&L added 54 beehive ovens near Longworth Street. Hazelwood's industrial growth called for even more workers, many of whom hailed from Central Europe.

By the 1950s, Hazelwood was home to over 200 businesses and a diverse demographic. But as the steel industry declined in the 1980s, so did the community.
Hazelwood: A Rivertown Rich in History Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, April 19, 2016
2. Hazelwood: A Rivertown Rich in History Marker
As businesses closed, people moved away, and Pittsburgh's last steel mill, Hazelwood Coke Works, closed in 1998.

Today, the Coke Works site is owned by Almono LP, a partnership of four Pittsburgh foundations and RIDC. a vision plan for the 178-acre site was developed with the input of stakeholders and the community. With a shared vision for the future, the site is poised to re-enter the market, connect with regional economic hubs, share the mile-and-a-half of riverfront with the community, and become an instigator of growth, renewal, and progress in Pittsburgh.
 
Erected by Three Rivers Heritage Trail, Friends of the Riverfront, The Heinz Endowments, RIDC Almono Partnership, City of Pittsburgh.
 
Location. 40° 25.745′ N, 79° 57.53′ W. Marker is in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, in Allegheny County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Hazelwood Trail and Hot Metal Bridge. Touch for map. Part of the Three Rivers Heritage Trail, the marker is located next to the Hot Metal Bridge. Marker is in this post office area: Pittsburgh PA 15219, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Materials Handling (approx. ¼ mile away); The MonCon Railroad (approx. ¼ mile away); Open Hearth Steel (approx. ¼ mile away); Eliza Furnace (approx. 0.3 miles away); Iron and Steel Workers (approx. 0.3 miles away); Jones and Laughlin (approx. 0.3 miles away); John T. Comès (approx. 0.7 miles away); Schenley Park Bridge (approx. 0.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pittsburgh.
 
Also see . . .  Hazelwood, Once Known as Scotch Bottom. Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh Article (Submitted on April 19, 2016, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNative AmericansSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on April 19, 2016, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 233 times since then and 69 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 19, 2016, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
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