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Near Manassas in Prince William County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Twilight Clash

Second Battle of Manassas

 

—Day Two August 29, 1862 7 p.m. —

 
Twilight Clash Marker image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, April 30, 2016
1. Twilight Clash Marker
Inscription. With his army reunited, Confederate General Robert E. Lee looked for an opportunity to strike the enemy. Lee proposed attacking the Federal left flank, which lay south of the Warrenton Turnpike. With evening drawing on, General James Longstret proposed an alternative - a reconnaissance in force to secure a foothold near the enemy from which to launch a major attack the next morning.

About the same time, General John Pope erroneously concluded the Confederate army was retreating. The Federal commander quickly chose to mount a pursuit and ordered a Union division westward on the turnpike towards the small hamlet of Groveton. As the head of the Union column ascended this hill near sundown, it collided with Longstreet's troops making their reconnaissance.

Though darkness prevented any decisive action, the engagement temporarily altered battle plans and instilled caution on both sides. The action revealed the Confederate army was not in retreat, but the clash also denied the Rebels the foothold they sought near the Federal army. Before dawn the Confederates quietly pulled back to their original positions west of Groveton.
 
Erected by Manassas National Battlefield Park, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location.
View of the "Twilight Clash" Marker from the Brooklyn Fourteenth Monument image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, April 30, 2016
2. View of the "Twilight Clash" Marker from the Brooklyn Fourteenth Monument
The"Twilight Clash" Marker is located behind the monument, in front of the artillery piece.
38° 48.768′ N, 77° 32.775′ W. Marker is near Manassas, Virginia, in Prince William County. Marker can be reached from Lee Highway (U.S. 29) one mile west of Sudley Road (Virginia Route 234), on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is located near the "Brooklyn Fourteenth" monument, 400 feet west of the first parking lot on the New York Monuments road (Driving Tour Stop 9). Marker is at or near this postal address: 6511 Sudley Rd, Manassas VA 20109, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Brooklyn Fourteenth (a few steps from this marker); Federal Artillery Position (within shouting distance of this marker); Groveton Confederate Cemetery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Groveton – Second Battle of Bull Run (about 400 feet away); Lucinda Dogan House (approx. 0.2 miles away); 5th Regiment New York Volunteer Infantry (approx. 0.2 miles away); Confederate Counterattack (approx. 0.2 miles away); "The Very Vortex of Hell" (approx. ¼ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Manassas.
 
Also see . . .
1. Manassas National Battlefield Park. National Park Service (Submitted on May 13, 2016.) 

2. Old Marker at this Location. This marker replaced an older one at this location titled “Fighting
View of the "Twilight Clash" Marker from an Artillery Piece image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, April 30, 2016
3. View of the "Twilight Clash" Marker from an Artillery Piece
At the bottom of the hill near U.S. 29 is the Village of Groveton and the Lucinda Dogan House. Groveton is auto tour stop no. 8 on the Manassas National Battlefield Park Driving Tour.
in Twilight” (Submitted on May 13, 2016.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
View of the Village of Groveton as seen from the Brooklyn Fourteenth/"Twilight Clash" hill. image. Click for full size.
By Shane Oliver, April 30, 2016
4. View of the Village of Groveton as seen from the Brooklyn Fourteenth/"Twilight Clash" hill.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on May 13, 2016, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. This page has been viewed 299 times since then and 67 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 13, 2016, by Shane Oliver of Richmond, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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