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MARKER DATABASE
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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ticonderoga in Essex County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

George Augustus Viscount Howe

 
 
George Augustus Viscount Howe Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
1. George Augustus Viscount Howe Marker






Inscription.
To commemorate
the heroic gallantry and
noble character
of
George Augustus
Viscount Howe
Brigadier-General
of
His Majesty’s Forces
in America.
Killed near Trout Brook
two days before
the great battle of Carillon
July 6, 1758.
His death an irreparable loss
to the Army.
Beloved and honored
by the officers and men
of both the British
and American regiments.
Erected by
The English Speaking Union
of the United States
1958

 
Erected 1958 by United States of America.
 
Location. 43° 50.928′ N, 73° 23.91′ W. Marker is in Ticonderoga, New York, in Essex County. Marker is on Sandy Redoubt, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is along the entrance road to Fort Ticonderoga. Marker is in this post office area: Ticonderoga NY 12883, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. “The Black Watch” ( within shouting distance of this marker); Colonial Battles Fought in this Vicinity ( about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); The Carillon Battlefield ( approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named “The Black Watch”
Marker at Fort Ticonderoga image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
2. Marker at Fort Ticonderoga
( approx. ¼ mile away); The French Lines ( approx. ¼ mile away); Near this spot stood Montcalm ( approx. 0.3 miles away); Hut Sites ( approx. 0.3 miles away); Eighteen Colonial Soldiers ( approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ticonderoga.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Ticonderoga National Historic Landmark. (Submitted on July 26, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
2. The Battle of Ticonderoga 1758. An account of the battle that was fought just after the death of Lord Howe from BritishBattles.com. (Submitted on July 26, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

3. Lord Howe’s Bones Found. Laborers on a Ticonderoga sewer strike his tombstone. New York Times article published October 11, 1889. (Submitted on July 26, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 
 
Categories. MilitaryNotable PersonsWar, French and Indian
 
Death Site of George Howe image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 12, 2008
3. Death Site of George Howe
Lord Howe was killed at this location near Trout Brook, on what is today called Lord Howe Street. A marker was once located ar this site, but was gone at the time this photo was taken.
Grave of Lord Howe image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin
4. Grave of Lord Howe
The remains of Lord Howe were discovered by a laborer digging a trench. A stone in the grave identified the body as that of General Howe. His grave is located a few miles from the marker.
Seal of Lord Howe image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 10, 2008
5. Seal of Lord Howe
This seal appeared on the headstone of the remains discovered in 1889, and identified the body as that of Lord Howe.
Entrance to Fort Ticonderoga image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
6. Entrance to Fort Ticonderoga
The George Howe marker is one of many along the entrance road to Fort Ticonderoga.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 26, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,882 times since then and 63 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on July 26, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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