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Ticonderoga in Essex County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Carillon Battlefield

 
 
The Carillon Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
1. The Carillon Battlefield Marker
Inscription. In the mid-18th century, this battlefield was a focal point in the Seven Years’ War, a world war between France and Great Britain. Here the two super-powers struggled for control of the Lake Champlain Lake George water highway, the strategic communication link between New York, the British administrative center, and Montreal, the second largest city of New France.
In July of 1758, the British commanded by General James Abercromby, launched an attack on For Carillon (Ticonderoga), the newest French fort in New France. The British mustered an army of 16,000 British regulars and American provincials, the largest ever assembled to date in North America.
Louis-Joseph de Gozon, the Marquis de Montcalm, led the French defense of Carillon. In less than 48 hours, Montcalm’s 3400 French regulars and a handful of Canadians constructed defensive earthworks, the “French Lines,” across the Heights of Carillon.
In a bloody day of fighting on 8 July 1758, the British lost nearly 2000 troops. The Highland Regiment suffered nearly 2/3 casualties, the highest sustained by a unit in a single-day action in North American history. Proportionally, Montcalm lost as many.
Here Montcalm had won the greatest French victory of the Seven Years’ war, although he was outnumbered 5 to 1. He gave thanks to God by creating a red-painted
The Carillon Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
2. The Carillon Battlefield Marker
cross at the center of the Lines. The Cairn, positioned at the near edge of “the killing zone,” commemorates the valor of the Highland Regiment.
For two generations, in two wars, armies returned to the same battlefield. In 1759, the British returned on another attempt to drive the French from Carillon-and used the “French Lines” to protect themselves as they laid siege to the fort. During the Revolution, the American army dug in here in the summer and fall of 1776 as they succeeded in stopping Sir Guy Carelton’s British advance up Lake Champlain. In 1777, the old French earthworks served as the American outer defenses against Burgoyne’s advance. Later that autumn, the Americans, under Col. John Brown, succeeded in recapturing the French Lines, but lacked sufficient artillery to dislodge the British and German troops garrisoning the Fort. Many of these men (on both sides) had fought on this ground almost twenty years earlier.
 
Location. 43° 50.921′ N, 73° 23.609′ W. Marker is in Ticonderoga, New York, in Essex County. Marker is on Sandy Redoubt, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is located on the entrance road to Fort Ticonderoga. Marker is in this post office area: Ticonderoga NY 12883, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance
Marker on Fort Ticonderoga Entrance Road image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin
3. Marker on Fort Ticonderoga Entrance Road
The Carillon Battlefield marker can be seen in the background of this photo.
of this marker. “The Black Watch” (a few steps from this marker); The French Lines (a few steps from this marker); Near this spot stood Montcalm (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Hut Sites (about 500 feet away); George Augustus Viscount Howe (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named “The Black Watch” (approx. 0.3 miles away); Garrison Cemetery (approx. 0.3 miles away); Troops of Colonial Wars at Ticonderoga (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Ticonderoga.
 
More about this marker. The upper portion of the marker contains a map of “A Plan of the town and Fort of Carillon and Ticonderoga with the attack made by the British Army. Superimposed on Thomas Jefferys’ 1768 map reproduced from the Fort Ticonderoga museum collection is the latest research about the disposition of the troops on 8 July 1758.” The French Troops under Montcalm and British Troops under Abercromby are listed on the marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Battle of Ticonderoga 1758. Account of the battle on the website BritishBattles.com. (Submitted on July 26, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Fort Ticonderoga National Historic Landmark. (Submitted on July 26, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
The French Lines image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin
4. The French Lines
Fortifications on the Carillon Battlefield built by the French in 1758 are still visible today.

 
Categories. Forts, CastlesMilitaryNotable EventsNotable PlacesWar, French and IndianWar, US Revolutionary
 
The Cairn image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, July 11, 2008
5. The Cairn
This cross represents the one put up by Montcalm's troops after their defeat of a superior British force on July 8, 1758 to commemorate the valor of the Highland Regiment.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on July 26, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,753 times since then and 55 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on July 26, 2008, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.
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