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Chalmette in Saint Bernard Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

Chalmette National Cemetery

 
 
Chalmette National Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, July 31, 2016
1. Chalmette National Cemetery Marker
Inscription. Chalmette National Cemetery was established in 1864 as a burial place for Union soldiers who died in the gulf area during the Civil War. It also served as the site for reburials of soldiers from battlefield cemeteries in the region. This plot of ground was part of the battlefield during the Battle of New Orleans. Only four U.S. veterans of the War of 1812 are buried here. None of the British who died in the battle are buried in the cemetery.

The National Park Service received stewardship of the cemetery in 1933. The peaceful aspect that so often envelops the cemetery provides a moment in which we, the living, may acknowledge the contribution of those who have fought to defend this country.
 
Erected by National Park Service - United States Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 29° 56.5′ N, 89° 59.3′ W. Marker is in Chalmette, Louisiana, in Saint Bernard Parish. Marker is on Chalmette National Park Scenic Road (Tour Loop Rd) 0.6 miles east of Battlefield Road, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. The Chalmette National Park Scenic Road, or Tour Loop Road, is located within the Chalmette Battlefield portion of the Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve. Marker is in this post office area: Chalmette LA 70043, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Soldiers Buried at Chalmette Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, July 31, 2016
2. Soldiers Buried at Chalmette Marker
Chalmette National Cemetery is part of a typical early land division in the area. The original entrance stood at the river end of the property. In 1867 more land was incorporated, and the brick wall was completed in 1875. In 1910 more land was added at the opposite end and a year later the entrance gates were moved to their present position.

There are over 15,000 individuals buried in the 17.5 acre cemetery. Veterans of all major American wars and conflicts are interred here. Of these 15,000, more the 6,700 are unknown. By 1945, all available burial sites were either occupied or reserved, and the cemetery was closed. It was reopened briefly in the 1960's for burial of Viet Nam War veterans. An occasional funeral still occurs for those who have one of the few remaining reserved plots or for widows of veterans already in the cemetery.
At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. “Where Has Our Equipment Gone?” (within shouting distance of this marker); Roads and Ditches (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lethal Exposure (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Battle Ends (approx. 0.2 miles away); Pakenham's Fall (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Main Attack (approx. 0.2 miles away); British Batteries (approx. mile away); Fazendeville (approx. mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chalmette.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar of 1812War, US Civil
 
Chalmette National Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, July 31, 2016
3. Chalmette National Cemetery
Chalmette National Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, July 31, 2016
4. Chalmette National Cemetery
The Freedmen's Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, July 31, 2016
5. The Freedmen's Cemetery Marker
Here lie the remains of ex-slaves. The Freedman's Cemetery was established by the Freedman's Bureau in 1867, when the bureau received permission to use four acres of the former battlefield as a civilian burial ground. The property reverted to other ownership when the bureau was discontinued, and the cemetery gradually fell into ruins. All above-ground traces disappeared before the end of the nineteenth century.
Chalmette National Cemetery - Headstone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Bosse, July 31, 2016
6. Chalmette National Cemetery - Headstone Marker
Here we honor veterans who served their country.

The United States Congress established this site as a National Cemetery in 1864 for the re-interment of Union soldiers who died in Civil War hospitals and were buried in various nearby locations.

Over 15,000 veterans of American wars and their dependents are buried here. Of these, 6,773 are unknown. A variety of headstones and inscriptions mark the graves.

Four veterans of the War of 1812 were re-interred here. Only the unknown veteran fought at the battle of New Orleans. He died on his way home to Tennessee after the war.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 19, 2017. This page originally submitted on August 23, 2016, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 138 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on August 23, 2016, by Tom Bosse of Jefferson City, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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