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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Amsterdam in Montgomery County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Chuctanunda Terrace Site

 
 
Chuctanunda Terrace Site Interpretive Panel image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2016
1. Chuctanunda Terrace Site Interpretive Panel
Inscription. Native Americans have been visiting the site for nearly 5,000 years, drawn to this location by the rich resources of the Mohawk River and the Chuctanunda Creek North, and the animals and plants that flourished on their banks.

The site was visited most frequently between 3,500 and 3,000 years ago, by people who made what archaeologists call Snook Kill and Orient Fishtail-type projectile points. These people did not have the ceramic pots of later cultures, but the stone tools they left behind tell us that daily activities at the site probably consisted of fishing in the river, collecting plants and nuts, and hunting game and processing the hides.

Around AD1300 to 1500, the site was visited by Mohawk Indians, who left behind fragments of their distinctive incised pottery, triangular arrow points, and other artifacts. Few artifacts attributable to the Mohawks were found, so the site does not appear to be a large village like the ones found west of Amsterdam. Instead, it is more likely the site served the same function as it did much earlier, possibly an encampment visited by just a few people on hunting, fishing, or gathering excursions away from the main village.

 
Erected 2016 by Erie Canal National Heritage Corridor & National Park Service, U.S. Department of Interior.
 
Location.
Chuctanunda Terrace Site Marker Detail image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2016
2. Chuctanunda Terrace Site Marker Detail
Distinctive Pottery Fragments - Incised Mohawk Pottery Fragments Dating to circa AD 1300-1500
42° 56.164′ N, 74° 11.638′ W. Marker is in Amsterdam, New York, in Montgomery County. Marker can be reached from Bridge Street. Touch for map. The marker is at the north end of the $17.5 million Mohawk Valley Gateway Overlook Pedestrian Bridge, which was officially opened Wednesday Aug. 31, 2016 in Amsterdam, NY. Marker is in this post office area: Amsterdam NY 12010, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Donato (Dan) Persico, Chief T/M (approx. 0.2 miles away); Sweet Canal Store (approx. 0.2 miles away); "Mother Lake" (approx. mile away); Sanford Mansion (approx. 0.3 miles away); Green Hill Cemetery (approx. 0.4 miles away); Guy Park (approx. 1.1 miles away but has been reported missing); Guy Park, 1766 (approx. 1.1 miles away); Hurricana Stock Farm (approx. 1.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Amsterdam.
 
Also see . . .  News Article about Chuctanunda Artifacts. (Submitted on September 3, 2016, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Additional keywords. Amsterdam Pedestrian Bridge
 
Categories. AnthropologyNative Americans
 
Chuctanunda Terrace Site Marker Detail image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2016
3. Chuctanunda Terrace Site Marker Detail
Right to the Point - Late Archaic and Late Woodland Projectile Points recovered from the site.
Chuctanunda Terrace Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 1, 2016
4. Chuctanunda Terrace Site Marker
The view is to the south from the north end of the Mohawk Valley Gateway Overlook Pedestrian Bridge, which was officially opened Wednesday Aug. 31, 2016 in Amsterdam, NY.
Chuctanunda Terrace Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, September 5, 2016
5. Chuctanunda Terrace Site Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 9, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 3, 2016, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 123 times since then and 35 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 3, 2016, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   5. submitted on September 7, 2016, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
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