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Gainesville in Cooke County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Cooke County C.S.A. / 2nd Frontier Regiment

 
 
Cooke County, C.S.A. Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 21, 2016
1. Cooke County, C.S.A. Marker
Inscription.
Front
Cooke County
C.S.A.

Military, defense center in Civil War. Cooke voted 231 to 137 anti-secession, yet nine military units served Confederacy from here. In constant danger of Federal or Indian attack. Col. Wm. C. Young of Cooke, with 1,000 men took Indian Territory forts from Federals April-May 1861. Commissioners set up regular patrols. Forted a home as refuge for dependents. Gave $4,000 for munitions and wool cards to make cloth. Cotton gin, grist mill, gunsmiths, blacksmiths made war goods. C.S.A. was furnished epsom salts from Indian creek. Corn, beef, pork, wheat, other produce fed the military, home front. County swapped 25 steers for salt for dependent families. People worked hard, sacrificed much, protected homes of fighting men of Confederacy.

Reverse
2nd Frontier Regiment

Organized Oct. 1863 with Gainesville as headquarters, the Second Frontier Regiment, Texas Cavalry C.S.A. guarded counties along Red River, to keep down outlaws, Indians, deserters. Col. James Bourland (1803-1868) was appointed Commander
2nd Frontier Regiment Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 21, 2016
2. 2nd Frontier Regiment Marker
and it became known as "Bourland's Border Regiment." Union invasion from north of Red River was constantly threatened. These mounted troops patrolled, maintained posts along river and in Indian Territory. Confederate Seminole troops served with the unit. Famous Confederate Indian Gen. Stand Watie and his Cherokee Brigade shared duty along perilous border. Bourland also worked with Frontier Regiment, state troops, that maintained line posts 100 mi. west, a day's horseback ride apart, from Red to Rio Grande rivers, and with a state militia line 30 mi. to the west.
 
Erected 1963 by the State of Texas. (Marker Number 1054.)
 
Location. 33° 37.472′ N, 97° 9.261′ W. Marker is in Gainesville, Texas, in Cooke County. Marker is on West California Street (State Highway 51) west of Frontage Interstate 35 Frontage Road, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Located in front of Moffett Park. Marker is in this post office area: Gainesville TX 76240, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Moffett Park (here, next to this marker); American Paint Horse Association
View of marker looking towards Interstate Highway 35. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, July 21, 2016
3. View of marker looking towards Interstate Highway 35.
(about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Gainesville Community Circus (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Old California Trail (approx. half a mile away); Cooke County Courthouse (approx. half a mile away); Barbed Wire in Cooke County (approx. 0.6 miles away); Santa Fe Passenger Depot (approx. 0.8 miles away); Gainesville-Fort Sill Road (approx. 0.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Gainesville.
 
Also see . . .  Texas State Historical Association article on Cooke County. (Submitted on September 8, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNative AmericansWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 8, 2016. This page originally submitted on September 8, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 134 times since then and 36 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on September 8, 2016, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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