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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Dolores Hidalgo in Municipality of Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato, Mexico — The Central Highlands
 

The Decrees of Benito Juárez in Dolores Hidalgo

 
 
The Decrees of Benito Juárez in Dolores Hidalgo Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 1, 2016
1. The Decrees of Benito Juárez in Dolores Hidalgo Marker
Inscription.
El 6 de junio de 1863,
durante su estancia en esta ciudad
El C. Presidente de los Estados Unidos Mexicanos
Lic. Benito Juárez García
Decretó:
1º "Que la Villa de Dolores queda erigida en ciudad"
2º "En su plaza principal se levantará una columna,
y sobre esta se colocará la estatua
de Don Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla"
3º "La Casa del Heroe será perpetuamente propiedad de la nación"
A 150 años de la entrada en vigor de dicho decreto,
El H. Ayuntamiento Constitucional 2012-2015
refrenda su gratitud al “Benemerito de las Americas”
Dolores Hidalgo Cuna de la Independencia Nacional, Gto.
a 6 de junio de 2013.

English translation:
On June 6, 1863, during his stay in this city,
The President of the United Mexican States
Lic. Benito Juárez García
Decreed:
1st "That the Villa of Dolores is elevated to the status of City"
2nd "In its main square a column will be erected, a statue of Miguel Hidalgo y Costilla"
3rd "The House of the Hero will be perpetually owned by the nation"
On the 150th anniversary of these decrees going into effect,
The Honorable and Constitutional City Hall, 2012-2015
Gives its gratitude to the "Most Distinguished of the Americas"
Dolores Hidalgo, Cradle of National Independence, Guanajuato,
The Decrees of Benito Juárez in Dolores Hidalgo Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. Makali Bruton, October 1, 2016
2. The Decrees of Benito Juárez in Dolores Hidalgo Marker
The marker is to the right of a man holding a guitar near the center of the photo in this view.
June 6, 2013.

 
Erected 2013 by El Honorable Ayuntamiento Constitucional de Dolores Hidalgo, 2012-2015.
 
Location. 21° 9.462′ N, 100° 56.069′ W. Marker is in Dolores Hidalgo, Guanajuato, in Municipality of Dolores Hidalgo. Touch for map. The marker is in the center of the town square of Dolores Hidalgo, in front of the Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church (Templo de la Parroquia de Nuestra Señora de los Dolores), near the intersection of Calles Guanajuato and Hidalgo. It is just to the north of the monument to Miguel Hidalgo, near some park benches.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 23 kilometers of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Miguel Hidalgo (within shouting distance of this marker); The Route of Hidalgo (within shouting distance of this marker); From Here Hidalgo Proclaimed Mexican Independence (within shouting distance of this marker); Cocomacán (within shouting distance of this marker); The Route of the Insurgents (about 180 meters away, measured in a direct line); Birthplace of José Alfredo Jiménez (about 180 meters away); The Hidalgo House and Museum (about 210 meters away); Sanctuary of Jesus Nazarene of Atotonilco UNESCO World Heritage Site (approx. 22.4 kilometers away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dolores Hidalgo.
 
Regarding The Decrees of Benito Juárez in Dolores Hidalgo. While there are probably hundreds of markers and monuments dedicated to Benito Juárez throughout the world, this one is remarkable for what it leaves unsaid. When Juárez stayed in Dolores Hidalgo on June 6, 1863, he was fleeing the invading French forces that would finally enter Mexico City on June 7. The marker fails to mention that Juárez, even while fleeing to the northern extreme of Mexico in order to continue guerrilla actions against the French, took advantage of his stopover here in order to make these three decrees with the hope that they would help his countrymen to symbolically tie the conflict against the French to the earlier struggle for Mexican Independence. In the end, he was proven right: the French eventually removed their support from the imposed king Maximillian and Juárez was able to restore the Mexican Republic in 1867.
 
Categories. Native AmericansPatriots & PatriotismWars, Non-US
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 24, 2016. This page originally submitted on November 24, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico. This page has been viewed 98 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 24, 2016, by J. Makali Bruton of Querétaro, Mexico.
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