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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Related Historical Markers

To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Close Up View of the Map image, Touch for more information
By Craig Swain, September 2, 2007
Close Up View of the Map
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — A Civil War Redoubt — The Manassas Museum System
This 11-acre historic park, part of the Manassas Museum System, contains one of only two surviving Civil War fortifications in the City of Manassas. The earthwork was built by Confederate troops in the Spring of 1861 as part of the Manassas Junction . . . — Map (db m2366) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — The People and the Land — The Manassas Museum System
American Indians lived on the land long before white settlers and slaves came to this area. Living in nomadic hunter-gatherer groups, people called the Dogues and the Mannahoacs roamed the Northern Virginia Piedmont region. Archaeological evidence . . . — Map (db m2386) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — Unearthing the Past — The Manassas Museum System
Archeology is the detective work of history. Evidence recovered from the soil often provides valuable clues for learning how people lived, worked, and died, especially when documentary sources are scarce. Excavations were conducted at the Hooe . . . — Map (db m2393) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — Monster Manassas - How Strong a Stronghold? — The Manassas Museum System
The Mayfield earthwork, known in military engineering terms as a redoubt, was a circle of raised earth some 200 feet in diameter. It may have included a retaining wall of timbers and brush, and planks to support artillery. While capable of . . . — Map (db m2396) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — Firepower — The Manassas Museum System
Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard, commander of the troops defending Manassas, had been one of the pre-war U.S. Army's outstanding artillerists. Fearing an imminent Union attack, he worked feverishly to obtain cannons for the fortifications and experienced . . . — Map (db m2405) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — Quaker Guns — The Manassas Museum System
Some of the Confederate cannons placed at Manassas and nearby Centreville were for show only. These non-functioning cannon were intended to deceive Union soldiers who might turn their telescopes on the earthworks: “This was nothing other . . . — Map (db m2408) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — Fortifying the Junction — The Manassas Museum System
Following Virginia’s decision to secede from the Union in in April 1861, Southern troops began arriving here at the small village of Tudor Hall, which soon came to be known as Manassas Junction. This place, where the Orange & Alexandria and Manassas . . . — Map (db m41503) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — The Changing Fortunes of War — The Manassas Museum System
After the First Battle of Manassas on June 21, 1861, Confederate forces continued to hold Manassas Junction until March 1862. They evacuated Manassas and moved south in order to counter Union Gen. George B. McClellan’s plans to attack Richmond. . . . — Map (db m41504) HM
Virginia, Manassas — Mayfield Civil War Fort — Manning the Fort — The Manassas Museum System
The life of Civil War soldiers in camp was one of boredom, fear, mischief, disease and even death. Thousands of young men, many of whom had never before left their family farms or urban neighborhoods, were crowded into the makeshift camps. Disease . . . — Map (db m41505) HM

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