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9 entries match your criteria.  

 
 

Historical Markers in Comstock, Texas

 
Clickable Map of Val Verde County, Texas and Immediately Adjacent Jurisdictions image/svg+xml 2019-10-06 U.S. Census Bureau, Abe.suleiman; Lokal_Profil; HMdb.org; J.J.Prats/dc:title> https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Usa_counties_large.svg Val Verde County, TX (62) Crockett County, TX (46) Edwards County, TX (18) Kinney County, TX (39) Sutton County, TX (35) Terrell County, TX (7)  ValVerdeCounty(62) Val Verde County (62)  CrockettCounty(46) Crockett County (46)  EdwardsCounty(18) Edwards County (18)  KinneyCounty(39) Kinney County (39)  SuttonCounty(35) Sutton County (35)  TerrellCounty(7) Terrell County (7)
Del Rio is the county seat for Val Verde County
Comstock is in Val Verde County
      Val Verde County (62)  
ADJACENT TO VAL VERDE COUNTY
      Crockett County (46)  
      Edwards County (18)  
      Kinney County (39)  
      Sutton County (35)  
      Terrell County (7)  
 
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1Texas (Val Verde County), Comstock — 3567 — Near Site, Southern Pacific Ceremony of Silver Spike
Marked completion of Southern Pacific Railway. Eastern part originated in Texas in 1850s; then was rechartered 1870 by Texas Legislature as Galveston, Harrisburg & San Antonio Rwy., designed to join Houston and San Antonio to the Rio Grande. T. . . . Map (db m36447) HM
2Texas (Val Verde County), Comstock — 16779 — Comstock Reported missing
In the early 1880s, Comstock developed as a station on the Galveston, Harrisburg and San Antonio railway because of the natural lake and water supply. The former townsite of Soto or Sotol City was replaced with Comstock, named after John B. . . . Map (db m79326) HM
3Texas (Val Verde County), Comstock — 13909 — Dead Man's Pass
This narrow canyon marks a remote and perilous section of a road traveled from San Antonio to El Paso and on to California following the Gold Rush of the 1840s. Adding to the hardships of a journey that took several weeks, this particular area was . . . Map (db m79325) HM
4Texas (Val Verde County), Comstock — 13504 — Medal of Honor Fight, 1875
In the 1870s, the U.S. Army relied on Black Seminole (Seminole-Negro) Indian scouts in campaigns against raiding Native Americans along the Texas-Mexico border. In April 1875, Lt. John L. Bullis and three scouts -- Sergeant John Ward, Private Pompey . . . Map (db m35448) HM
5Texas (Val Verde County), Comstock — Pecos High Bridge
Southern Pacific Railroad was first to cross Pecos River ( 1891) with High Bridge. At that time, it was world’s longest (2,180 ft) and highest (321 ft. above water) railroad bridge. In June 1923, the Texas Highway Department constructed a . . . Map (db m35485) HM
6Texas (Val Verde County), Comstock — 3975 — Pecos River High Bridge
High canyon walls dominate the last 60 miles of the Pecos River before it enters the Rio Grande. The Southern Pacific Railroad built the first high bridge across the Pecos in 1891. The first highway bridge to span the river was built one mile down . . . Map (db m36940) HM
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7Texas (Val Verde County), Comstock — 12798 — Railroad Bridges Over the Pecos
A major tributary of the Rio Grande, the Pecos River was long a barrier to transportation, particularly across the deep gorge that once marked its joining with the Rio Grande. Construction of the first railroad bridge over the Pecos took place in . . . Map (db m36445) HM
8Texas (Val Verde County), Comstock — 12694 — Site of Vinegarroon
Crossing the Pecos River Canyon was the last major obstacle the Southern Pacific Railroad faced in completing its southern transcontinental route linking New Orleans and San Francisco. As "Tunnel No. 2" was excavated on the west side of the canyon . . . Map (db m36442) HM
9Texas (Val Verde County), Comstock — 13410 — The Pecos River in Literature and Folklore
Noted for mineral-thick waters and sudden floods, the Pecos River snakes through Texas on its way to the Rio Grande. Historian J. Evetts Haley and folklorist J. Frank Dobie, who called it “a strange river,” and a “barricade,” . . . Map (db m56006) HM
 
 
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Dec. 10, 2022