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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
 
 

Columbia Heights Heritage Trail Historical Markers

 
A City in Itself Marker image, Touch for more information
By Devry Becker Jones, December 26, 2017
A City in Itself Marker
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 3 — A City in Itself — Cultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail
Columbia Heights by the mid 1920s was a center of white elite activity and commerce. The elegant, Neoclassical style Riggs Bank branch and the Italian Renaissance style Tivoli Theater opened to great acclaim. Soon after, radio station WRC moved . . . — Map (db m111929) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 2 — Amusement Palace — Cultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail
The intersection of 14th Street and Park Road has been the center of community life since at least 1871, when the neighborhood was called Mount Pleasant and storekeeper George Emery made his living on the northwest corner to your left. Emery's . . . — Map (db m111928) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 15 — College Hill — Cultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail
Wayland Seminary opened in Foggy Bottom just after the Civil War to train formerly enslaved people and others as “preachers and teachers for the South” and as missionaries to evangelize Africa. In 1875 it moved here, later merging . . . — Map (db m23947) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 5 — Community Builders — Cultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail
Harry Wardman, Washington's prolific developer, built nearly all of the 300 houses to your right between Monroe Street and Spring Road. Wardman, an English immigrant and self-made millionaire, became known for his rowhouses, whose front porches . . . — Map (db m112051) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 8 — Girard Street Elites — Cultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail
The 1100 and 1200 blocks of Girard Street once were home to a “Who’s Who” of African American leaders. This and nearby “double-blocks” are the heart of John Sherman’s Columbia Heights subdivision. By placing all houses . . . — Map (db m130747) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 9 — Justice vs. Injustice — Cultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail
These elegant 13th Street houses were constructed when racial separation was legal and widely accepted. In 1910 the deeds for many houses across 13th Street had covenants banning “any negro or colored persons.” Those on this side . . . — Map (db m23603) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 18 — Literary Lights — Cultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail
"A Black world in which a wonderful democracy of conditions prevailed — waitresses, doctors, preachers, winos, teachers, numbers runners and funeral directors, prostitutes and housewives, cabdrivers and laborers all lived as neighbors." . . . — Map (db m111988) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 1 — Main Street — Cultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail
Fourteenth Street has always been the business backbone of Columbia Heights. Beginning in the 1890s, electric streetcars dropped passengers at nearly every corner, attracting commerce. By 1925 storefronts occupied the blocks between Euclid and . . . — Map (db m120995) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 16 — Mansions, Parks, and People — Cultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail
On your right is Josephine Butler Parks Center, home of Washington Parks & People, a network of groups devoted to DC and its parks. The network's 1927 mansion, which once housed the Hungarian delegation, was part of an embassy row envisioned by . . . — Map (db m63849) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 7 — Nob Hill — Cultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail
For Nearly 50 Years, this corner was home to Nob Hill Restaurant, one of the nation's first openly gay bars for-and run by-African Americans. Started in the 1950s as a private social club, Nob Hill went public in 1957. Patrons enjoyed . . . — Map (db m86014) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 10 — On the Heights — Cultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail
In the days of legally segregated public education (1862-1954), this school building was Central High, the gem of the School Board’s white division. But by 1949, it had few students, as the post-World War II suburban housing boom had drawn . . . — Map (db m23608) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 14 — Pitts Motor Hotel — Cultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail
The Pitts Motor Hotel, formerly located at 1451 Belmont Street, lingers in memory for two reasons. In the 1960s it was a gathering place of Civil Rights movement leaders. Later it became a "welfare hotel." In March 1968 the Reverend Dr. Martin . . . — Map (db m63706) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 17 — Social Justice — Cultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail
Straight ahead is All Souls Church, Unitarian, long known for its social activism, starting with abolitionism in the 1820s and ranging through nuclear disarmament and interracial cooperation. During the segregation era, All Souls was one of the . . . — Map (db m24152) HM
District of Columbia (Washington), Columbia Heights — 19 — The Latino Intelligence Center — Cultural Convergence — Columbia Heights Heritage Trail
This block is home to some of the largest Latino organizations in the city, all founded as migration from Central America and the Caribbean increased in the 1970s. Several began with a boost from Cavalry United Methodist Church at 1459 Columbia . . . — Map (db m111986) HM

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