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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
St. Louis, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Miles of Steamboats

Jefferson National Expansion Memorial

 
 
Miles of Steamboats Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 12, 2017
1. Miles of Steamboats Marker
At various times the levee teemed with explorers heading west, slaves being taken to auction, gold miners rushing to California, overlanders heading to Oregon for free land, and soldiers going to fight in Mexico.
Inscription. Click to hear the inscription.  St. Louis was the third busiest port in the United States during its 1830s to 1850s heyday. Steamboats waiting to load and unload their cargo lined up for miles along the Mississippi River. Field calls of dockworkers filled the air. You might have heard whispering about the Underground Railroad.

When the Civil War interrupted river traffic, the port began to decline. By the 1890s Chicago, Illinois was the main Midwestern port because of its railroad connections and Great Lakes access.
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 37.539′ N, 90° 11.053′ W. Marker is in St. Louis, Missouri. Marker can be reached from North Leonor K Sullivan Boulevard half a mile south of Laclede's Landing Boulevard, on the right when traveling south. Touch for map. Marker is located on the Gateway Arch trail, a short distance northeast of the Arch, in Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Park. Marker is in this post office area: Saint Louis MO 63102, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance
Miles of Steamboats Marker (<i>wide view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 12, 2017
2. Miles of Steamboats Marker (wide view)
of this marker. The Gateway Arch (within shouting distance of this marker); Pierre Laclede (within shouting distance of this marker); Rock Solid (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Curves Ahead (about 500 feet away); Speedy Delivery (about 500 feet away); The Captains' Return (about 500 feet away); In Memory of Robert E. Lee (about 600 feet away); Gateway to the West (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in St. Louis.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Great Migration: 1803-1860. Between 1840 and 1860, the population exploded with the arrival of many new immigrants. Germans and Irish were the dominant ethnic groups settling in St. Louis, especially in the wake of the German Revolution and the Irish Potato Famine. St. Louis was a strategic location during the American Civil War, but it stayed firmly under Union control - in large part because of the fiercely loyal German influence. (Submitted on August 28, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Many St. Louis Sites Significant in Black History. As a major city in a slave state just across the Mississippi River from the free state of Illinois, St. Louis was at a pivotal point in the Underground Railroad. The trail of the Underground Railroad in St. Louis is not as well known as in many free states, but over the years, many stories of escaped slaves and those who helped them have passed from generation to generation.
Mississippi River: bridges and former landing sites (<i>view from hill above marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 12, 2017
3. Mississippi River: bridges and former landing sites (view from hill above marker)
These stories, along with well-documented events, created the legacy of the Underground Railroad. (Submitted on August 28, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. St. Louis in the American Civil War. The city of St. Louis, Missouri was a strategic location during the American Civil War which held significant value for both Union and Confederate forces. As the largest city in the fiercely divided border state of Missouri and the most important economic hub on the upper Mississippi River, St. Louis was a major launching point and supply depot for campaigns in the Western and Trans-Mississippi Theaters. (Submitted on August 28, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

4. Gateway Arch National Park. National Park Service (Submitted on August 29, 2018.) 
 
Categories. Abolition & Underground RRIndustry & CommerceWar, US CivilWaterways & Vessels
 
Gateway Arch Trail (<i>view of trail just north of marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, September 12, 2017
4. Gateway Arch Trail (view of trail just north of marker)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 16, 2018. This page originally submitted on August 28, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 39 times since then. Last updated on October 15, 2018, by Devry Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 28, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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