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Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

James Habersham

 
 
James Habersham Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
1. James Habersham Marker
Inscription. Here rests James Habersham -- associate of George Whitefield and a leading merchant, planter, and public servant during Georgia's colonial era.

Mr. Habersham came to the colony in 1738 as a youthful follower of the Rev. Whitefield and collaborated with that eminent divine in the founding of Bethesda orphanage. he successfully administered the affairs of that institution during its early years. He established, in 1744, what developed into the most important commercial house in the Province, and became one of Geogia's largest planters.

During the colonial period he ably filled a number of important public positions, including provincial Secretary; President of His Majesty's Council for Georgia, and acting Governor of the Province during the absence of Sir James Wright, 1771-1773.

Though he disapproved Parliament's oppressive acts, Habersham remained firmly loyal to the Crown. Universally respected, he died, while visiting in New Jersey, August 28, 1775 -- his last days darkened by the shadow of the impending Revolutionary struggle which arrayed, in his words and in his own case, "father against son, and son against father."
 
Erected by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 25-15.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included
James Habersham Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, February 2008
2. James Habersham Marker
in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 32° 4.542′ N, 81° 5.386′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker can be reached from E. Oglethorpe Ave.. Touch for map. Located In Colonial Park (Cemetery). Marker is in this post office area: Savannah GA 31401, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Joseph Habersham (1751-1815) (here, next to this marker); Hugh McCall (1767-1823) (a few steps from this marker); Great Yellow Fever Epidemic of 1820 (within shouting distance of this marker); Gen. Samuel Elbert (1740-1788) (within shouting distance of this marker); Major John Berrien (1759-1815) (within shouting distance of this marker); Button Gwinnett (within shouting distance of this marker); William Stephens (within shouting distance of this marker); Nathanael Greene, Maj. Gen., Continental Army (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Savannah.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. Marker for Colonial Park
 
Also see . . .
1. Habersham Family. James Habersham (ca. 1712-75) arrived in colonial Georgia from England in 1738. Habersham was prominent in the economic
James Habersham Marker, at Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2008
3. James Habersham Marker, at Colonial Park Cemetery, Savannah
and political life of colonial Georgia. (Submitted on February 13, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Famous Americans; James Habersham. opened a school for orphans and destitute children ,1744 became a merchant,1754 became secretary of the province and one of the councillors (Submitted on February 13, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesCharity & Public WorkColonial EraNotable Persons
 
James Habersham Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, November 29, 2009
4. James Habersham Marker
James Habersham image. Click for full size.
By New Georgia Encyclopedia
5. James Habersham
James Habersham Marker and Tombstone image. Click for full size.
By Brian Scott, April 21, 2005
6. James Habersham Marker and Tombstone
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016. This page originally submitted on February 13, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,766 times since then and 46 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on December 5, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   2. submitted on February 13, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3. submitted on December 5, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4. submitted on September 27, 2015, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   5. submitted on February 13, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   6. submitted on October 4, 2014, by Brian Scott of Anderson, South Carolina. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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