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Cleveland in Bradley County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Fort Hill Cemetery

Defending Cleveland

 
 
Fort Hill Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 6, 2016
1. Fort Hill Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  First called City Cemetery, this is the resting place of both Confederate and Union soldiers. On November 4, 1862, a train wreck south of Cleveland killed 17 Confederate soldiers who are buried here in a mass grave. Nearby engagements in 1863 resulted in the deaths of Union soldiers also interred here. Capt. Jonathan Dickerson, 112th Illinois Infantry, was killed on September 18 by Confederate troops on the Dalton Road. Fort Dickerson in Knoxville was named after him. Nineteen-year-old Pvt. Hazard Barrere, 1st Ohio Cavalry, was mortally wounded on Inman Street in downtown Cleveland on November 27. Slaves belonging to Confederate sympathizer Jane Hardwick carried him into her residence, where she and her daughters nursed him until his death.

The high terrain made ideal sites for Fort McPherson and Fort Sedgwick, the latter located here. With a clear view of the railroad and depot, the forts defended Cleveland during Confederate Gen. Joseph Wheeler's attack on August 22, 1864. After receiving cannon fire from Fort McPherson, Wheeler sent a message to Union commander Col. Horatio G. Gibson: "I desire to know if you intend compelling me
Fort Hill Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 6, 2016
2. Fort Hill Cemetery Marker
"Defenses of Cleveland, Tenn." from The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War (1891-1895)
to shell the town?" Gibson confidently replied, "I have no objections to your shelling the town," and ordered Cleveland evacuated as both forts' guns opened fire on the Confederates. Wheeler and his men withdrew during the night.

On May 30, 1914, the Cleveland chapter of the Grand Army of the Republic (G.A.R.), the Union veterans group, erected a monument at the cemetery's entrance to memorialize Bradley County's "Boys in Blue." It is one of only three G.A.R. monuments in Tennessee.
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails series list.
 
Location. 35° 9.327′ N, 84° 52.917′ W. Marker is in Cleveland, Tennessee, in Bradley County. Marker can be reached from 12th Street SW west of Goode Street SW, on the right when traveling west. Located in Fort Hill Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cleveland TN 37311, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 12 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Cleveland During the Civil War (approx. half a mile away); Oak Grove Male Academy (approx. half a mile away); Col. Benjamin Cleveland (approx. 0.6 miles away); Lee College
Fort Hill Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brandon Fletcher, June 6, 2016
3. Fort Hill Cemetery Marker
(approx. one mile away); Cooper Cemetery (approx. 1.6 miles away); "Chief Jack" Walker (approx. 3.7 miles away); Civil War "No Man's Land" (approx. 10.4 miles away); Charleston on the Hiwassee (approx. 11.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Cleveland.
 
Horatio Gibson image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
4. Horatio Gibson
Col. Horatio C. Gibson (second from left), pictured as a captain two years before he arrived in Cleveland.
Joseph Wheeler image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
5. Joseph Wheeler
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 27, 2017. It was originally submitted on March 23, 2017, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. This page has been viewed 374 times since then and 82 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on March 23, 2017, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   2. submitted on March 25, 2017, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee.   3, 4, 5. submitted on March 23, 2017, by Brandon Fletcher of Chattanooga, Tennessee. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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Jul. 11, 2020