Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Rockville in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Higgins House

Arresting Civilians

 

— Gettysburg Campaign —

 
Higgins House - Arresting Civilians Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, January 14, 2006
1. Higgins House - Arresting Civilians Marker
Inscription.  Early Sunday morning, June 28, 1863, Confederate cavalrymen arrived at merchant John Higgins' house to arrest him, but he had already left for Christ Episcopal Church. Instead they captured Eblen, a 17 year-old Union soldier recuperating here. When troopers told Dora Higgins to open the doors to their store, she refused, appealing to General J.E.B. Stuart for aid. Stuart replied that she was to stay in front of the store and "let one of them dare resist you." For the next six hours, Dora kept the Confederates at bay.

George Peter, a secessionist and neighbor of the Higgins, demanded that arrested citizens receive fair treatment. Dora Higgins wrote "had it not been for their endeavors, every Union man would have been taken and every store laid open,... for they said to carry out such an order would be their (Secessionists') entire ruin." Stuart could not afford to antagonize Southern sympathizers, and a captured Union wagon train answered his men's needs.

(Inset, lower right): Matthew Fields, secessionist owner, editor, and publisher of the Montgomery County Sentinel, was arrested twice without formal charges
Higgins Family Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, January 17, 2006
2. Higgins Family Cemetery
This is located on Arundel Avenue near Washington Avenue in the Twinbrook neighborhood of Rockville. Buried here is James Higgins, a Revolutionary War soldier that was an ancestor of the man who built the Higgins House.
Click or scan to see
this page online
when many civil rights were suspended under martial law. Levin Hoskinson, his apprentice printer who joined the 7th Virginia Infantry, was killed at the First Battle of Manassas on July 21, 1861. He was the first Rockville man lost in the war.

(Caption of pictures in lower left): Merchant John Higgins, Courtesy of the Montgomery County Historical Society. • George Peter became a state senator after the war. Courtesy of the Montgomery County Historical Society.

(Caption of picture in upper right): Oldest photograph of Rockville's main thoroughfare, ca. 1870, with hay scale in the public triangle. The 1840 courthouse is out of the picture to the right. The Female Seminary and John Higgins' store are out of the picture to the lower left. Stuart's prisoners were taken from the courthouse down the road toward Brookeville.
- Courtesy of Peerless Rockville
 
Erected by Maryland Civil War Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails series list. A significant historical date for this entry is June 28, 1863.
 
Location. 39° 5.105′ N, 77° 9.278′ W. Marker is in Rockville, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker is at the intersection of West Middle
Headstone and Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, January 17, 2006
3. Headstone and Plaque
This is the actual grave of the Revolutionary War soldier James Higgins.
Lane and North Adams Street, on the right when traveling west on West Middle Lane. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Rockville MD 20850, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Early Rockville Residential Area (a few steps from this marker); Beall-Dawson House and Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Beall-Dawson House (within shouting distance of this marker); Beall Dawson House (within shouting distance of this marker); Lucy Simpson's Rockville Institute (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Beall-Dawson House (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Stonestreet Medical Museum (about 300 feet away); Jerusalem - Mount Pleasant Church and Parsonage (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Rockville.
 
More about this marker. One of the series of Maryland Civil War Trails markers. This one is on the Gettysburg Campaign.
 
Plaque image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, January 17, 2006
4. Plaque
The plaque reads: Revolutionary Soldier James Higgins 1732 - 1816
North Adams Street and Higgins House Markers image. Click for full size.
By Tom Fuchs, January 14, 2006
5. North Adams Street and Higgins House Markers
Merchant John Higgins image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 29, 2013
6. Merchant John Higgins
Close-up of photo on marker
Montgomery County Historical Society
George Peters became a<br> state senator after the war. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 29, 2013
7. George Peters became a
state senator after the war.
Close-up of photo on marker
Montgomery County Historical Society
Rockville's main thoroughfare, ca. 1870 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 29, 2013
8. Rockville's main thoroughfare, ca. 1870
Oldest photograph of Rockville's main thoroughfare, ca. 1870, with hay scale in the public triangle. The 1840 courthouse is out of the picture to the right. The Female Seminary and John Higgins' store are out of the picture to the lower left. Stuart's prisoners were taken from the courthouse down this road toward Brookeville.
Close-up of photo on marker
Peerless Rockville
Map -- You Are Here image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 29, 2013
9. Map -- You Are Here
Close-up of map on marker
101 North Adams image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 29, 2013
10. 101 North Adams
Sign by the Front Door, 101 North Adams image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, June 29, 2013
11. Sign by the Front Door, 101 North Adams
Williams = Wilson House
circa 1780
Rockville's Oldest Building
In 1863, General J.E.B. Stuart captured the house's then owner, John H. Higgins, and several other known Union sympathizers, who were hiding in the Vestry of Christ Episcopal Church.
Rockville Historic District Commission,
Maryland Historial Trust
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 14, 2019. It was originally submitted on January 21, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,591 times since then and 24 times this year. Last updated on April 15, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on January 21, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   2, 3, 4. submitted on November 7, 2007, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   5. submitted on January 21, 2006, by Tom Fuchs of Greenbelt, Maryland.   6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on July 4, 2013, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

Share This Page.  
Share on Tumblr
m=102790

Paid Advertisement
Apr. 22, 2021