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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Advancing With Scott's Brigade

Following in Their Footsteps

 
 
Advancing With Scott's Brigade Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brandon Stahl
1. Advancing With Scott's Brigade Marker
Inscription.  (preface)
This walkway traces the route that the men of Confederate Gen. Thomas M. Scott’s brigade took in the Battle of Franklin. Read below to see what it was like then and to follow in their footsteps
Distance to Union Lines: 1,200 yards (1,143 m)
Local Time: 4:20 pm, November 30, 1864

At this point Scott’s brigade entered the range of case-shot shells from Union smoothbore artillery in the defenses ahead of you. Loaded with scores of lead spheres, the shells acted like large grenades as they burst overhead. In this ordeal the men of Scott’s brigade were not alone.

To your front and left marched Gen. Winfield S. Featherston’s brigade, with all of its six regiments and one battalion hailing from Mississippi. Directly behind you were Gen. John Adams and his six infantry regiments, also from Mississippi.

After a few more minutes passed, Adams’ men saw him for the last time. Adams had a full view of the tremendous losses that Scott’s and Featherston’s men were suffering, and he maneuvered his brigade to your left to find a better path into the Union lines. He did not find it and fell in
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Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: War, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails series list. A significant historical date for this entry is November 30, 1864.
 
Location. 35° 54.555′ N, 86° 51.533′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker can be reached from Eastern Flank Circle, 0.4 miles south of Lewisburg Pike (Business U.S. 431), on the right when traveling west. Located in Eastern Flank Battlefield Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1368 Eastern Flank Cir, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Eastern Flank Battlefield Park (within shouting distance of this marker); Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Advancing With Scott's Brigade (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Advancing With Scott's Brigade (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named The Battle of Franklin
Union Artillery image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
2. Union Artillery
Union artillery engaging Confederate positions, with case-shot air bursts in the distance
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Harpeth River Restoration and Fish Passage (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Winfield Scott Featherstone image. Click for full size.
3. Winfield Scott Featherstone
Winfield Scott Featherstone (1820-1891), a Tennessee native, was a veteran of the Creek Indian Wars of the 1830s. He moved to Mississippi where he practiced law for 20 years before the war and was elected to Congress in 1847. When the war started, he raised the 17th Mississippi Infantry Regiment. He served in Virginia at Ball’s Bluff then was promoted to brigade command and fought in the Peninsula Campaign, Second Battle of Manassas, and Fredericksburg before being transferred to the West. He led his brigade in the campaigns of Atlanta, Franklin, and Nashville. He returned to his practice after the war and served in the Mississippi legislature.
Artillery Case-shot image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Sam Whitson
4. Artillery Case-shot
Armed with a timed fuse, case shot was designed to explode overhead and cause widespread damage to humans and horses. Shown here is the actual size of a case shot and its cross-section. This particular type would have been fired from 3-inch Ordnance Rifle artillery, and each shell weighed around eleven pounds (5kg)
Advancing With Scott's Brigade Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Brandon Stahl
5. Advancing With Scott's Brigade Marker
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 27, 2020. It was originally submitted on May 24, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. This page has been viewed 404 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on May 24, 2017, by Brandon Stahl of Fairfax, Virginia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

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Feb. 28, 2024