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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Frederick in Frederick County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Maryland's “Cemetery Beautiful”

 
 
Maryland's “Cemetery Beautiful” Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
1. Maryland's “Cemetery Beautiful” Marker
Inscription.  Mount Olivet Cemetery is considered one of the most distinguished burial grounds in the country. Here, in peaceful tranquility, rest national and local heroes, veterans of every major conflict in our country's history, inventors, artists, business entrepreneurs and thousands of others whose memory is cherished.

The Charter of the Mount Olivet Cemetery Company was recorded on October 4th, 1852. At that time 32 acres were purchased, and in 1853, a landscape architect named James Belden of Baltimore was hired to layout a “rural” or “garden” cemetery offering a peaceful, romantic resting place for both the wealthy and the average citizen.

Walks, driveways and plantings soon interlaced the entire grounds. Prominent citizens often hired the finest architects to design large, elaborate monuments in the form of obelisks, columns and other displays of masterful sculpting for their plots. Additional artistic elements included mausoleums, carved granite stonework, sculpted rails and gates, and ornate iron fencing.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Cemeteries & Burial Sites. A significant historical date for this entry is October 4, 1852.
 
Location.
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39° 24.383′ N, 77° 24.759′ W. Marker is in Frederick, Maryland, in Frederick County. Marker can be reached from South Market Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 515 South Market Street, Frederick MD 21701, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. “Frederick's Other City” (here, next to this marker); Francis Scott Key (a few steps from this marker); O Say Can You See? (a few steps from this marker); Home of the Brave (a few steps from this marker); Final Resting Place (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Francis Scott Key (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Francis Scott Key (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Francis Scott Key (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Frederick.
 
Maryland's “Cemetery Beautiful” Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
2. Maryland's “Cemetery Beautiful” Marker
Mount Olivet Cemetery image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
3. Mount Olivet Cemetery
James Belden's original architectural plan for Mount Olivet Cemetery (c. 1853)
Close-up of photo on marker.
Mount Olivet Cemetery, Frederick, MD. image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
4. Mount Olivet Cemetery, Frederick, MD.
Close-up of photo on marker.
Restrictions image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
5. Restrictions
Restrictions were placed on pets, children (not accompanied by adults), smoking, “use of ardent spirits,” and cutting or pulling any shrub or flower. (Period Photos date from 1909).
Close-up of photo on marker.
Admit Lot-Holder image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Allen C. Browne, May 1, 2017
6. Admit Lot-Holder
Visitors and lot-holders alike had to abide by a strict set of rules and regulations put forth by the Cemetery Association. At one time, entry required a ticket or pass like the one above here.
Close-up of photo on marker.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 29, 2017. It was originally submitted on May 27, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 242 times since then and 10 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on May 27, 2017, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 12, 2024