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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Leesburg in Loudoun County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Glenfiddich House

Formerly Harrison Hall

 
 
Glenfiddich House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 26, 2018
1. Glenfiddich House Marker
Inscription.  
This property has been
placed on the
National Register
Of Historic Places

by the United States
Department of Interior
Circa 1840

 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: CommunicationsNotable BuildingsWar, US Civil.
 
Location. 39° 7.07′ N, 77° 33.833′ W. Marker is in Leesburg, Virginia, in Loudoun County. Marker can be reached from North King Street (Business U.S. 15) north of North Street, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 205 North King Street, Leesburg VA 20176, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Lee Comes to Leesburg (within shouting distance of this marker); Mt. Zion United Methodist Church (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Early Methodism in Leesburg (about 600 feet away); In Memory of Richard Owings (about 600 feet away); Fighting for Freedom (about 700 feet away); Confederate Soldiers (about
Glenfiddich House Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 26, 2018
2. Glenfiddich House Marker
800 feet away); Loudoun County Courthouse (approx. 0.2 miles away); In Memory of the Heroic Dead (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Leesburg.
 
Regarding Glenfiddich House. The 1840 Italianate house incorporates a 1780 log house. In the 1960s James Dickey lived in the 1780 portion of the house.
 
Additional comments.
1. Harrison Hall in the Civil War

“Located at 205 N. King Street in Leesburg, Harrison Hall was built in 1780. On October 21, 1861, ladies of the house watched the Battle of Ball’s Bluff from the upper-story windows. Afterward, wounded soldiers were cared for at the Hall, including Col. E.R. Burt of the 18th Mississippi, who died there four days after the battle. During the course of the war, the Hall enjoyed a reputation as a hospitality center for visiting Confederate officers. On September 4, 1862, its most prominent guest arrived. Gen. Robert E. Lee, commander of the Confederate Army of Northern Virginia, arrived in an ambulance wagon, and left with his two hands bandaged in splints after an accident with his horse Traveler. That night, Lee conducted a meeting in the front parlor of the house.
Glenfiddich House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 26, 2018
3. Glenfiddich House
In attendance were his top commanders, including Gens. Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson, James Longstreet, Lewis A. Armistead, and J.E.B. Stuart. They finalized plans for the invasion of Maryland, which would lead to the Battle of Antietam. Today, Harrison Hall is known as the Glenfiddich House.” [Text from http://civilwar.visitloudoun.org]
    — Submitted March 1, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.

2. Deliverence

“From 1966-68 poet and author James Dickey resided at Glenfiddich House, an easy commute to his position as poetry consultant to the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. It was during his stay that he began his manuscript for his novel Deliverance. The desk that he wrote the first drafts of the novel is still at Glenfiddich House.” - Wikipedia
    — Submitted March 1, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
 
205 N King<br>Glenfiddich House<br>Formerly known as Harrison Hall image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 26, 2018
4. 205 N King
Glenfiddich House
Formerly known as Harrison Hall
Eagle Knocker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 26, 2018
5. Eagle Knocker
Glenfiddich House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 26, 2018
6. Glenfiddich House
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 8, 2018. It was originally submitted on March 1, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 148 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on March 1, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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Aug. 15, 2020