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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Chester in Queen Anne's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Crossing the Narrows

 
 
Crossing the Narrows Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 21, 2017
1. Crossing the Narrows Marker
Inscription.  The Kent Narrows was once the only crossing point from Kent Island to the Eastern Shore mainland. The earliest crossings were made by Native Americans in log canoes. Colonies crossed the marshy straits by ferry. Causeways and bridges were built to carry horse-drawn carriages, trains, and eventually cars across the water. Today more than 25 million vehicles cross the Narrows annually.

c. 1672 — Ferry links from Annapolis is to Kent Island and across the Kent Narrows are part of the Great Road system through the colonies.

c. 1826 — Earthen causeway built, closing the straits and joining the island with the mainland.

1876 — Causeway removed to allow boat traffic between the Eastern Bay and the Chester River.

1876 — Drawbridge replaces the causeway.

c. 1900 — Queen Anne's Railroad Company builds railroad bridge across the Narrows.

1952 — The Chesapeake Bay Bridge opens, joining the Eastern and Western Shrores of the Bay for the first time.

1956 — Last train crosses the Narrows and rail bridge is formally dosed.

Crossing the Narrows Marker image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 21, 2017
2. Crossing the Narrows Marker
1990 —65 foot-tall Kent Narrows Bridge completed.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Roads & VehiclesWaterways & Vessels.
 
Location. 38° 58.522′ N, 76° 14.96′ W. Marker is in Chester, Maryland, in Queen Anne's County. This marker is near the Chesapeake Heritage & Visitor Center at the bridge to Ferry Point Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 425 Piney Narrows Road, Chester MD 21619, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Chesapeake Country National Scenic Byway (within shouting distance of this marker); Maryland's Eastern Shore (within shouting distance of this marker); Byway Destinations (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Byway Destinations (within shouting distance of this marker); Enemy Occupation (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Crossing Point (approx. half a mile away); Working the Waters (approx. 0.6 miles away); The James E. Kirwan Museum (approx. 1.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Chester.
 
The Great Road system extended from Virginia to Massachusetts image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 21, 2017
3. The Great Road system extended from Virginia to Massachusetts
Close up of map on marker
Kent Narrows bridge, early 20th century postcard. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 21, 2017
4. Kent Narrows bridge, early 20th century postcard.
Close up of image on marker
Locomotive crossing the Kent Narrows, 1922 image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 21, 2017
5. Locomotive crossing the Kent Narrows, 1922
Close up of image on marker
The Emma-N-Sarah<br>passing through Kent Narrows<br>from the Chester River toward Eastern Bay. image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, November 21, 2017
6. The Emma-N-Sarah
passing through Kent Narrows
from the Chester River toward Eastern Bay.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 11, 2018. It was originally submitted on February 1, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page has been viewed 135 times since then and 18 times this year. Last updated on March 11, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on February 1, 2018, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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Jun. 7, 2020