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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Historical District in Alexandria, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum

City of Alexandria Est. 1749

 
 
Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, March 30, 2018
1. Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum Marker
Inscription.  The Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum traces one of America's oldest continuously-run family businesses that combined manufacturing, wholesaling and retailing. Founded in 1792, and operated just across Fairfax Street until 1933, the pharmacy was established by Edward Stabler, a devout Quaker and avid abolitionist. Stabler sold a wide variety of products to both city and country residents — from Martha Washington to Robert E. Lee, from the local doctor to the local farmer. Typical products sold included medicine, farm and garden equipment, surgical instruments, dental equipment, soap, perfume, mineral water, cigars, window glass, paint and varnish, artists' supplies, combs and brushes. Much of the medicine sold was created on-site using plant-based materials.

The apothecary remained open during the Civil War after Mary Leadbeater, John's widow, signed the official "Oath of Allegiance" to the United States government. During the Union occupation of Alexandria, the business catered to the large military population, and the Apothecary's books reported that many soldiers stood in line to buy "Hot Drops," a cough expectorant containing
Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, March 30, 2018
2. Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum Marker
paprika and alcohol. The drops sold for a penny each, and over $1,000 were sold in a single day!

Open to the public, the museum displays a remarkable collection of herbal botanicals, label-under glass display bottles, and pharmaceutical equipment from the 19th- and 20th-centuries.
 
Erected by City of Alexandria.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Industry & CommerceScience & MedicineWar, US CivilWomen. In addition, it is included in the Virginia, The City of Alexandria series list.
 
Location. 38° 48.264′ N, 77° 2.537′ W. Marker is in the Historical District in Alexandria, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of King Street and South Fairfax Street, on the right when traveling east on King Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 100 South Fairfax Street, Alexandria VA 22314, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Col. John Fitzgerald (here, next to this marker); The Ramsay House (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named The Ramsay House (a few steps from this marker); Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary (within shouting distance of this marker); Home of George Gilpin 1740-1813
Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, March 30, 2018
3. Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Alexandria (within shouting distance of this marker); The Port City (within shouting distance of this marker); The Athenaeum (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Historical District.
 
Also see . . .  Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum. (Submitted on April 2, 2018.)
 
Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, March 30, 2018
4. Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum Marker
Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum and Gift Shop (1792-1933) image. Click for full size.
By Devry Jones, March 30, 2018
5. Stabler-Leadbeater Apothecary Museum and Gift Shop (1792-1933)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 17, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 1, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 92 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on April 1, 2018, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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Jun. 2, 2020