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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Athens in Athens-Clarke County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Robert Toombs Oak

 
 
Robert Toombs Oak Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By David Seibert, February 10, 2008
1. Robert Toombs Oak Marker
Inscription.  
A majestic oak tree once stood on this spot and one of the University's most endearing legends also flourished here.

Robert Toombs (1810-1885) was young, and boisterous when he was dismissed from Franklin College in 1828. Five decades later it was said that Toombs returned on the next commencement day after he was expelled and spoke so eloquently under the tree that the entire audience left the chapel to hear him. Later, it was said, that the tree was struck by lightning on the day Toombs died and never recovered. The tree finally collapsed in 1908 and the remains were cut into mementos that have since been handed down by alumni.

Robert Toombs was a lawyer, planter and statesman. He served in the Georgia House 1837-1840, 1842-1845, in the U.S. Congress 1845-1853, the U.S. Senate from 1853 until he resigned in 1861. Toombs was Secretary of State of the Confederacy then a brigadier general in the C.S.A. He also played a major role in Georgia's Constitutional Convention of 1877.

Marker erected at direction of General Assembly resolution approved March, 1985.
 
Erected 1987 by
Robert Toombs Oak Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By David Seibert, May 30, 2009
2. Robert Toombs Oak Marker
Located on the south side of Demosthenian Hall
Click or scan to see
this page online
Georgia Department of Natural Resources. (Marker Number 029-15.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AgricultureEducationWar, US Civil. In addition, it is included in the Georgia Historical Society series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1828.
 
Location. 33° 57.406′ N, 83° 22.508′ W. Marker is in Athens, Georgia, in Athens-Clarke County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of East Broad Street (State Road 10 / 78) and Herty Street, on the left when traveling south. The marker is located on the south side of Demosthenian Hall, on the North (Old) Campus). It can be reached from the sidewalk running south through the Arch. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Athens GA 30601, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Chapel Bell (within shouting distance of this marker); The Red and Black (within shouting distance of this marker); Holmes/Hunter Academic Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Herty Field (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); University of Georgia (about 300 feet away); Site of First Classes (about 400 feet away); Abraham Baldwin (about 400 feet away); Old College (about 400 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Athens.
 
Demosthenian Hall image. Click for full size.
Photographed By David Seibert, May 30, 2009
3. Demosthenian Hall
Built in 1824, the Hall is still used by the remaining members of the Demosthenian Literary Society, which was founded in 1803. The Society and the University recently worked together to restore both floors of the building.
Robert Toombs image. Click for full size.
Internet Archive
4. Robert Toombs
First Secretary of State of the Confederacy
Member of the Confederate Senate
Brigadier General
from a photograph Battles and Leaders of the Civil War, Vol. 1, Robert Underwood Johnson & Clarence Clough Buel, 1887.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 15, 2021. It was originally submitted on September 28, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,905 times since then and 36 times this year. Last updated on October 1, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. Photos:   1. submitted on September 28, 2008, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   2, 3. submitted on May 31, 2009, by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia.   4. submitted on October 1, 2020, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.

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May. 23, 2022