Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Hill City in Pennington County, South Dakota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

"Work Call"

 
 
"Work Call" Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2018
1. "Work Call" Marker
Inscription.  
This memorial dedicated to
the young men of the
Civilian Conservation Corps
1933-1942

Made possible by a grant from
”Sarge”
Melvin B. Hermanson
2008

 
Erected 2008.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Charity & Public WorkMan-Made FeaturesParks & Recreational Areas. In addition, it is included in the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) 🏞️ series list.
 
Location. 43° 56.292′ N, 103° 33.675′ W. Marker is in Hill City, South Dakota, in Pennington County. Marker is on East Main Street (U.S. 385) 0.4 miles north of Museum Drive, on the left when traveling north. Marker is located on the grounds of the CCC Museum of South Dakota at this address. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 23935 US-385, Hill City SD 57745, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Black Hills Central Railroad (approx. 0.7 miles away); Von Woehrman Building (approx. 0.9 miles away); Hill City
"Work Call" Marker (<i>tall view; showing "CCC Boy" statue above marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2018
2. "Work Call" Marker (tall view; showing "CCC Boy" statue above marker)
(approx. 0.9 miles away); Not Just Any Old Railroad Line (approx. one mile away); Newton Lake CCC Camp (approx. 3 miles away); Sheridan (approx. 4.3 miles away); Harney Peak Lookout (approx. 5.2 miles away); Civilian Conservation Corps Camp (approx. 5.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hill City.
 
Also see . . .
1. Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). In his first 100 days in office, President Roosevelt approved several measures as part of his "New Deal," including the Emergency Conservation Work Act (ECW), better known as the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). With that action, he brought together the nation's young men and the land in an effort to save them both. Roosevelt proposed to recruit thousands of unemployed young men, enlist them in a peacetime army, and send them to battle the erosion and destruction of the nation's natural resources. More than any other New Deal agency, the CCC is considered to be an extension of Roosevelt's personal philosophy. (Submitted on July 15, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. The Official CCC Museum of South Dakota. The CCC Museum
"Work Call" Marker (<i>wide view showing South Dakota CCC Museum & Visitor Center in background</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, July 11, 2018
3. "Work Call" Marker (wide view showing South Dakota CCC Museum & Visitor Center in background)
of South Dakota is the home for an ever growing collection of photos, artifacts and of course the roster of the great men who's work is still very relevant today. Out of the economic chaos emerged the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). The goal was two-fold: conservation of our natural resources and the salvage of our young men. The work of America's young men dramatically changed the future. More than 27,000 men contributed to the many significant projects in South Dakota and were able to help support their families back home. (Submitted on July 15, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 18, 2018. It was originally submitted on July 15, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 88 times since then and 21 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on July 15, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement
Dec. 2, 2020