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New Haven in Franklin County, Missouri — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Private John Colter

Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail

 
 
Private John Colter Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, September 11, 2017
1. Private John Colter Marker
Inscription.  Born about the time of the American Revolution John Colter was enlisted as a private in the Lewis and Clark Expedition at Maysville, Kentucky in October, 1803. He began the expedition as an oarsman but because of his skills as a woodsman was relieved and became a hunter. Colter also served as a scout, messenger, and was often a friend of the Indians. He remained with the expedition until August, 1806 when he was discharged and returned to the mountains to trap.

Much of what we know about Colter's role in the expedition is recorded in journal entries written by members of the Corp of Discovery.

Journal Entries
Ordway, Sept. 6, 1804, "…Colter came to the boat had not found Shannon nor the horses but had kilted one buffelow, one elk, 3 deer one wolf 5 turkies and goose one beaver also."

Lewis, Aug. 24, 1805, "…and dispatched Colter on horseback with orders to loose on time reaching me.

Lewis, Sept. 10, 1805, "This evening one of our hunters (Colter) returned accompanied by three men of the Flathead nation who he had met in his excursion up Travellers rest Creek. On first meeting him the Indians
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were alarmed and prepared for battle with the bows and arrows, but he soon relieved their fears by laying down his fun and advancing toward them."

Clark, Sept. 27, 1805, "J. Colter returned he found only one of the lost horses, on his way killed a deer, half of which he gave the lndians the other proved nourishing to the sick."

Lewis, June, 5, 1806, "Colter and Bratton were permitted to visit the Indian village today for the purpose of trading for roots and bread, they were fortunate and made a good return.”

Ordway, July 15, 1806, “Colter killed a panther a deer and a rattlesnake. In the evening we camped in the mountains. Collins killed 4 elk. The musquetoes very troublesome in deed.”
 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: ExplorationWaterways & Vessels. In addition, it is included in the Lewis & Clark Expedition series list.
 
Location. 38° 36.893′ N, 91° 12.781′ W. Marker is in New Haven, Missouri, in Franklin County. Marker is at the intersection of Miller Street and Miller Street, on the left when traveling east on Miller Street. Marker is located at the kiosk in the center of John
Marker detail: "The Journey Begins" by Gary R. Lucy image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of Gary R. Lucy Gallery, Washington, Missouri
2. Marker detail: "The Journey Begins" by Gary R. Lucy
Colter Memorial Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: New Haven MO 63068, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Colter's Escape from the Blackfeet (here, next to this marker); The Lewis and Clark Expedition (here, next to this marker); From the Mountains to Missouri (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Private John Colter (a few steps from this marker); New Haven (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named Private John Colter (a few steps from this marker); Historic New Haven (a few steps from this marker); The Iron Horse Arrives (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in New Haven.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. John Colter
 
Private John Colter Marker (<i>wide view; marker visible on left wall of kiosk</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, September 11, 2017
3. Private John Colter Marker (wide view; marker visible on left wall of kiosk)
Private John Colter Memorial Rock (<i>located in center of kiosk</i>) image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, September 11, 2017
4. Private John Colter Memorial Rock (located in center of kiosk)
John Colter
Mountain Man
Member of the Lewis & Clark Expedition
Montana 2003
The Story of a Rock: Boulder in Colter Memorial came as a gift from the people of Montana image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Cosmos Mariner, September 11, 2017
5. The Story of a Rock: Boulder in Colter Memorial came as a gift from the people of Montana
From the New Haven Leader, Wednesday, September 17, 2003 (posted in kiosk):

So how did a granite boulder from Montana wind up in the John Colter Memorial Shelter in New Haven? David Menke, who organized the Colter project, said the original design for the Shelter included a rock column with a plaque on top. But when workers had finished the Shelter, the idea came up to put a large boulder at the center of the Shelter instead. Menke made some phone calls trying to find a rock in the Billings area [Montana]. Once the rock was chosen it was taken to a monument company where it was inscribed. From there it went to the brickyard, where it was wrapped and crated for shipment. A truck driver picked up the rock at the brickyard and drove 2,300 miles arriving on Sunday August 31.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 15, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 7, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 235 times since then and 40 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 8, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page.

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Apr. 25, 2024