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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Pocahontas in Hinds County, Mississippi — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Evolution of the Pocahontas Site

 
 
The Evolution of the Pocahontas Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 3, 2018
1. The Evolution of the Pocahontas Site Marker
Inscription.  The time during which American Indians lived at the Pocahontas site can be split into two periods: the period before Mound A was built and the period after. Before Mound A was built there appears to have been a relatively large group of people living at the site who formed a village community. This community was likely made up of families who shared common ancestral ties which bound them together as a community.

However, it is important to remember that this village represented only a single community that was part of a much larger cultural group whose members, formed communities throughout the region. There were undoubtedly important relationships among these widespread communities that resulted not only in the exchange of trade goods, but of people who moved from one community to another as a result of marriage bonds.

Even though the Pocahontas site was just one of hundreds of sites in this region, it is likely that the site held a special status in the minds of individuals who lived in this region. This special status seems to be evident in the fact that the Pocahontas site was chosen as the
The Evolution of the Pocahontas Site Marker with Mound A in the background. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 3, 2018
2. The Evolution of the Pocahontas Site Marker with Mound A in the background.
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location for constructing the large platform mound that you see in front of you. Platform mounds played important roles as centers for communal activities within American Indian societies.

Once Mound A had been built it undoubtedly served as a place where important cultural ceremonies could be conducted that acted to strengthen the social ties within and among communities. In fact, it appears that the Pocahontas site was eventually transformed into an exclusively ceremonial center, meaning the site was occupied by only a small group of people and became a place where groups throughout the region could meet to conduct ceremonial activities.
 
Erected by Mississippi Department of Transportation, Cobb Institute of Archaeology-Mississippi State University.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Anthropology & ArchaeologyNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 32° 28.202′ N, 90° 17.285′ W. Marker is in Pocahontas, Mississippi, in Hinds County. Marker can be reached from Highway 49 0.7 miles south of Kennebrew Road, in the median. Located at Pocahontas Mounds Roadside Park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Jackson MS 39209, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pocahontas Mounds (within shouting distance of this marker);
History of the Pocahontas Mounds image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, August 3, 2018
3. History of the Pocahontas Mounds
Environmental Archaeology (within shouting distance of this marker); Midden: Sifting Through the Trash (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Landscape Modification in Prehistoric Times (about 500 feet away); Ceremonial Mounds Of The Southeast (about 600 feet away); a different marker also named Pocahontas Mounds (approx. 0.2 miles away); Stone Fence Posts Mid-Western Kansas 1880’s (approx. 3.7 miles away); Osburn Stand (approx. 5.9 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Pocahontas.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia article on the Pocahontas Mounds. (Submitted on August 10, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on December 16, 2020. It was originally submitted on August 10, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 72 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on August 10, 2018, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

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Apr. 21, 2021