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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Titusville in Brevard County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Douglas Dummett - Dummett Grove

 
 
Douglas Dummett - Dummett Grove Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, January 2, 2013
1. Douglas Dummett - Dummett Grove Marker
Inscription.  Indian River oranges, one of Florida's most outstanding products were developed in the 19th century by Douglas Dummett. The Dummett family immigrated from the Barbados in 1807. By 1825, Thomas Dummett had acquired sugar plantations on the east coast of Florida. His son Douglas (b. 1806) established his plantation in this part of Merritt Island and began to grow oranges. Dummett used a new grafting technique later widely adopted in Florida. He grafted buds from sweet orange trees onto his sour orange trees. This method produced frost-resistant trees and was called top-grafting because budding began several feet above ground. Unlike many coastal planters, Dummett did not abandon his property during the Second Seminole War (1835-42). He served as captain in the “Mosquito Roarers,” a Florida Militia company formed to protect property in this area from Indian raids. Dummett continued to cultivate what were regarded as East Florida's most valuable orange groves until his death in 1873. He also held elective and appointive political offices. The Dummett groves were damaged beyond recovery in the 1893 hurricane and the freeze of 1894-95.
Douglas Dummett - Dummett Grove Marker (<i>tall view</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, January 2, 2013
2. Douglas Dummett - Dummett Grove Marker (tall view)
The property became part of Kennedy Space Center in 1963.
Sponsored by the Brevard County Historical Commission
in cooperation with Department of State
F-261 * 1976

 
Erected 1976 by Brevard County Historical Commission in Cooperation with the Florida Department of State. (Marker Number F-261.)
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AgricultureSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian.
 
Location. 28° 42.589′ N, 80° 43.827′ W. Marker is in Titusville, Florida, in Brevard County. Marker is on Courtenay Parkway North (State Road 3) 0.3 miles north of Biolab Road, on the left when traveling north. Marker is located along the west side of the highway, just to the north of an unmarked, unmaintained dirt road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Titusville FL 32796, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Haulover Canal (approx. 2.4 miles away); Clifton Colored School (approx. 3.7 miles away); Oliver's Camp (approx. 7.4 miles away); Greater St. James Missionary Baptist Church of Mims (approx. 7.4 miles away); Titusville Veteran's Memorial Fishing Pier (approx. 7.6 miles away); Harry T. & Harriette V. Moore Memorial Homesite
Douglas Dummett - Dummett Grove Marker (<i>wide view; looking north along Courtenay Parkway</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, January 2, 2013
3. Douglas Dummett - Dummett Grove Marker (wide view; looking north along Courtenay Parkway)
(approx. 7.9 miles away); Kennedy Space Center's Launch Complex 39 - 1965 (approx. 8 miles away); Old Glory (approx. 8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Titusville.
 
Also see . . .
1. Douglas Dummett. Douglas Dummett (1806–1873) a member of the Legislative Council of the Territory of Florida representing St. Johns County in 1843, and a member of the Florida House of Representatives representing Mosquito County in 1845. He was instrumental in developing the Indian River Citrus industry in Florida. Dummett's oranges were known for their flavor, commanding a premium of one dollar per box in northern ports. Dummett shared his knowledge of grafting and cultivation of the famous Indian River citrus with many of the new settlers in the north Indian River area. During the late 1800s his techniques spread south along the Indian River Lagoon. Douglas Dummett lived near his grove until his death in 1873. (Submitted on October 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Mosquito Roarers Militia Saw Action In Battles Of Second Seminole War. When the Second Seminole War broke out across Central and North Florida in late December 1835, the U.S. Army had only a few hundred troops stationed in the entire territory. If the land were to be defended from Seminole attacks, the settlers would
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have to help shoulder the responsibility. One of the militias formed by Florida volunteers was the Mosquito Roarers, which was made up of residents, workers and neighbors of the sugar plantations of coastal Mosquito County. (Submitted on October 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

3. Mosquito County, Florida. Mosquito County (also labeled on maps as Musquito County) is the historic name of an early county that once comprised most of the eastern part of Florida. Its land included all of present-day Volusia, Brevard, Indian River, St. Lucie, Martin, Seminole, Osceola, Orange, Lake, Polk and Palm Beach counties. Mosquito County went out of existence in 1844. In 1844, the expansive area of Mosquito County was cut in half with the southern half being named St. Lucia County, and the northern half being renamed Orange County. St Lucia County was renamed Brevard County in 1855. (Submitted on October 30, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 1, 2018. It was originally submitted on October 29, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 116 times since then and 44 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on October 29, 2018, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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Sep. 20, 2020