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Richmond Hill in Bryan County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

C.S.S. Nashville

 
 
C.S.S. Nashville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 5, 2008
1. C.S.S. Nashville Marker
Inscription.   Built by William Collyer in New York City. She was ordered by New York merchants and launched September 22, 1853. Her maiden voyage was from New York to Charleston, South Carolina, under the name United States Mail Steamship Nashville, with a cargo of mail and passengers. The bottom of the vessel was sheathed in copper in 1854 to prevent marine growth. She was overhauled in 1859, and received new boilers in June 1860.
The Nashville entered Charleston Harbor April 12, 1861, as the Civil War began. She was purchased by the newly formed Confederate States Navy for $100,000. She was the first vessel commissioned by the Confederate States Government and the first to fly a Confederate flag in England.
She entered South Hampton England, November 21, 1861, after capturing and burning the Union ship Harvey Birch.
The C.S.S. Nashville, renamed the Privateer Rattlesnake, came to an end of blockade running on February 28, 1863. Trapped in the Ogeechee by a sandbar at low tide, the guns of Fort McAllister could not protect her and within an hour the Union Ironclad Montauk
C.S.S. Nashville image. Click for full size.
By Naval History and Heritage Command
2. C.S.S. Nashville
had sunk the Confederate vessel.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: War, US CivilWaterways & Vessels.
 
Location. 31° 53.39′ N, 81° 11.939′ W. Marker is in Richmond Hill, Georgia, in Bryan County. Marker can be reached from Fort McAllister Road. Located at the Fort McAllister parking lot, near the visitor center for the state park. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Richmond Hill GA 31324, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Destruction of the C.S.S. Nashville (here, next to this marker); Sinking of the CSS "Nashville (Rattlesnake)" (a few steps from this marker); Fort McAllister The Naval Bombardments (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort McAllister The Assault From The Rear (within shouting distance of this marker); Capt. John McCrady (within shouting distance of this marker); Major John B. Gallie (within shouting distance of this marker); Tom Cat (within shouting distance of this marker); Machinery From The C.S.S. Nashville (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Richmond Hill.
 
More about this marker. (Upper Left Picture)
C.S.S. Nashville Burning the Harvey Birch by D. McFarlane, 1864


(Upper Right Picture)
From Tangled Machinery and Charred Relics, by Chance, Chance & Topper, 1985


(Lower left picture)
From A Short History of Naval and Marine Engineering by Eng. Capt. Dagar C. Smith, 1937


(Lower right picture)
From Tangled Machinery and Charred Relics, by Chance, Chance & Topper, 1985


C.S.S. Nashville Specifications

• Length - 216 feet • Draft - 12 feet • Displacement - 1,500 tons
• Engine - One side lever, two 32 feet side wheels

• Coal Bunkers - 185 tons capacity • Speed - 14 knots (12 miles )
per hour
 
Also see . . .  CSS Nashville. was a brig-rigged passenger steamer (Submitted on October 23, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
C.S.S. Nashville Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 5, 2013
3. C.S.S. Nashville Marker
Marker at Fort McAllister State Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 5, 2013
4. Marker at Fort McAllister State Park
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on March 12, 2019. It was originally submitted on October 23, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 1,516 times since then and 23 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 23, 2008, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3, 4. submitted on August 8, 2013, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page.
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Aug. 3, 2020