Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Antonio in Bexar County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Route of El Camino Real

 
 
Route of El Camino Real Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, February 17, 2019
1. Route of El Camino Real Marker
Inscription.  The main thoroughfare of early Texas, the Camino Real, or "King's Highway", followed ancient Indian and buffalo trail. It stretched 1,000 miles from Mexico to present Louisiana. Domingo Teran de los Rios, first Governor of Texas, blazed the central section of the road in 1691. Called the "Trail of the Padres", it linked Monclova, Mexico, with the Spanish Missions of East Texas. Over the centuries, priests, soldiers, traders, and settlers used the Camino Real. The French adventurer St. Denis probably traveled the road from Louisiana to the Rio Grande in 1714.

San Antonio was a major stop on this frontier highway. Moses Austin followed the Camino Real to San Antonio in 1820 seeking colonization rights from Spain. Many Anglo-American settlers called it the "Old San Antonio Road". It joined this city with Nacogdoches, San Augustine, and other East Texas Settlements.

In 1915 the Texas Legislature appropriated $5,000 to mark the historic roadway across the state. The Daughters of the American Revolution, along with other patriotic groups, endorsed the project. V.N. Zivley surveyed the route and indicated the spacing for granite
Route of El Camino Real Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, February 17, 2019
2. Route of El Camino Real Marker
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markers every five miles. Today many modern highways follow the path of the Camino Real.

Incise in base: Marker Sponsor: First Federal Savings and Loan Association of San Antonio
 
Erected 1979 by Texas Historical Commission. (Marker Number 1409.)
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraRoads & Vehicles. In addition, it is included in the El Camino Real de los Tejas National Historic Trail series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1691.
 
Location. 29° 30.916′ N, 98° 27.217′ W. Marker is in San Antonio, Texas, in Bexar County. Marker is at the intersection of Nacogdoches Road and Loop Interstate 410, on the right when traveling south on Nacogdoches Road. Marker is in front of the entrance to the office tower housing BBVA Compass Bank. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1100 NE Interstate 410 Loop, San Antonio TX 78209, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Dawson Massacre (approx. 2.2 miles away); Dawson Massacre Memorial (approx. 2.2 miles away); The Battle of the Salado (approx. 2.9 miles away); San Antonio Spring (The Blue Hole) (approx. 3.3 miles away); Coker Cemetery (approx. 3.6 miles away); Jefferson Davis Smith
Kings Highway/Camino Real Marker image. Click for full size.
By Brian Anderson, February 17, 2019
3. Kings Highway/Camino Real Marker
Kings Highway
Camino Real
Old San Antonio Road
Marked by the
Daughters of the
American Revolution
and the State of Texas
A.D. 1918


Approximately 128 identical markers were placed, at roughly 5 mile intervals, by the DAR in 1918 throughout Texas to mark the route of the historic highway.
(approx. 3.7 miles away); Malinda Brown Coker (approx. 3.7 miles away); John "Jack" Coker (approx. 3.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in San Antonio.
 
Also see . . .  Old San Antonio Road - The Handbook of Texas Online. Texas State Historical Association (TSHA) (Submitted on February 19, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Atascocita, Texas.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on February 20, 2019. It was originally submitted on February 19, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Atascocita, Texas. This page has been viewed 285 times since then and 105 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on February 20, 2019, by Brian Anderson of Atascocita, Texas.

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Dec. 7, 2021