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Indianapolis in Marion County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Susan B. Anthony

(February 15, 1820 - March 13, 1906)

 
 
Susan B. Anthony Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 20, 2019
1. Susan B. Anthony Marker
Inscription.  The second of seven children of a Quaker cotton manufacturer and abolitionist, Susan Brownell Anthony learned to read and write at just 3 years old. Her father structured her upbringing around self-discipline, principled beliefs and self-respect. After her family lost everything in a financial crash, Anthony became a teacher and was compelled into activism by the pay inequalities in her profession. Despite her support for racial equality, she narrowed her focus as a women's rights activist after the Fifteenth Amendment failed to give women the right to vote. She was co-founder of numerous women's rights groups and a tireless public speaker who gave 75 to 100 speeches every year for 45 years. He boundless dedication to women's right continues to benefit generations of women.

1826
Anthony's father withdrew her from school and taught her himself after her school refused to teach long division to girls.

1839
Anthony became a teacher to support her family and began advocating equal pay for women in education, who earned a fourth of their male colleagues' salaries.

1849
Anthony began
Susan B. Anthony Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, April 20, 2019
2. Susan B. Anthony Marker
attending conventions and gatherings in support of the temperance and abolitionist movements.

1851
Anthony met fellow feminist Elizabeth Cady Stanton and co-founded the first women's state temperance society with Stanton.

1852
After her first public speech at a women's rights, convention, Anthony began to receive acclaim as a strong public advocate for women's suffrage.

Watershed Moment
1866

A lifelong advocate for civil rights, Susan B. Anthony co-founded the American Equal Rights Association in 1866. After the Fifteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution gave only African-American men — and no women — the right to vote, she focused her efforts on entirely women's rights. In 1869, she co-founded the National Women Suffrage Association, an organization devoted to the creation of a constitutional amendment giving women the right to vote. The Nineteenth Amendment, which enabled women to vote, was enacted in 1920, 14 years after Anthony's death.

1898
Anthony began publishing a weekly journal, The Revolution. It supported universal suffrage and covered inequalities in daily life.
 
Erected by Cultural Trail Indianapolis.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Civil Rights
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EducationWomen. In addition, it is included in the Elizabeth Cady Stanton, the Indiana, Cultural Trail Indianapolis, the Quakerism ⛪, the Susan B. Anthony, and the Women's Suffrage 🗳️ series lists.
 
Location. 39° 46.608′ N, 86° 9.503′ W. Marker is in Indianapolis, Indiana, in Marion County. Marker is on West Walnut Street east of North Pierson Street, in the median. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 710 North Meridian Street, Indianapolis IN 46204, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Benjamin Franklin (a few steps from this marker); Mark Twain (within shouting distance of this marker); Thomas Edison (within shouting distance of this marker); Booker T. Washington (within shouting distance of this marker); Scottish Rite Cathedral (within shouting distance of this marker); Indiana Vietnam and Korean Wars Memorial (about 400 feet away,
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measured in a direct line); Andrew Carnegie (about 400 feet away); Wilbur and Orville Wright (about 500 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Indianapolis.
 
Additional keywords. first-wave feminism
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on June 3, 2020. It was originally submitted on April 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 95 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on April 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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Mar. 3, 2021