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Savannah in Chatham County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

The First Act of Alcohol Prohibition in America

 
 
The First Act of Alcohol Prohibition in America Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, April 28, 2019
1. The First Act of Alcohol Prohibition in America Marker
Inscription.  
The First Act of Alcohol
Prohibition in America was decreed
in Savannah in 1735

Issued by His Majesty King George II
to General James Oglethorpe,
founder of the Colony of Georgia


"Whereas it is found by Experience that the use of Liquors called Rum and Brandy, in the Province of Georgia are more particularly hurtful and pernicious to Man's Body and have been attended with dangerous Maladies and fatal distempers… NO Rum or Brandy nor any other kind of Spirits or Strong Waters by whatsoever name they are or may be distinguished… shall be imported or brought to shore."

His Royal Majesty King George II

 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Colonial EraLaw Enforcement.
 
Location. 32° 4.836′ N, 81° 5.677′ W. Marker is in Savannah, Georgia, in Chatham County. Marker can be reached from West Saint Julian Street east of Jefferson Street, on the right when traveling east. Marker is mounted at eye-level, on the American Prohibition Museum building, just to the left
The First Act of Alcohol Prohibition in America Marker (<i>marker mounted just left of entrance</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, April 28, 2019
2. The First Act of Alcohol Prohibition in America Marker (marker mounted just left of entrance)
of the front entrance. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 209 West Saint Julian Street, Savannah GA 31401, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Herndon “Johnny” Mercer (within shouting distance of this marker); Jonathan Bryan (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Evacuation of Savannah (about 400 feet away); Haitian Monument (about 400 feet away); First African Baptist Church (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named The First African Baptist Church (about 500 feet away); George Washington (about 600 feet away); Telfair Family Mansion (about 600 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Savannah.
 
Also see . . .
1. American Prohibition Museum. The very first act of alcohol prohibition in America was decreed right here on the cobblestones by General Oglethorpe himself in 1735, who asked King George II to issue orders that “NO Rum or Brandy nor any other kind of Spirits or Strong Waters” shall be brought to the city. All forms of alcohol were banned in the colony of Georgia — as well as slavery and lawyers — for a time, anyway. But nothing could dampen Savannah’s relationship with “strong waters.” Despite renewed efforts to ban booze throughout the centuries, bootleggers, barkeeps and moonshiners
American Prohibition Museum (<i>wide view; marker mounted just left of entrance</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, April 28, 2019
3. American Prohibition Museum (wide view; marker mounted just left of entrance)
made sure the city’s cup runneth over. (Submitted on April 29, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Rum Banned in Georgia, November 21, 1733. In response to an Aug. 12, 1733 letter from James Oglethorpe stating that rum drinking was responsible for much of the sickness and death in Georgia, the colony’s Trustees voted to prohibit the drinking of rum in Georgia and directed that all barrels or other containers of rum brought into the colony be destroyed. (Submitted on April 29, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on April 29, 2019. It was originally submitted on April 29, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 103 times since then and 39 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on April 29, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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Nov. 30, 2020