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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Martinsburg in Berkeley County, West Virginia — The American South (Appalachia)
 

Fort Evans

 
 
Fort Evans Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 18, 2019
1. Fort Evans Marker
Inscription.  Fort Evans, built here, 1755, was attacked by Indians, 1756. The men were absent but Polly Evans, whose husband, John, had built the fort, led the women in its defense. The Big Spring here was noted camping ground of both armies, 1861-1865.

Martinsburg Berkeley Co. CBV
West Virginia Division of Archives and History, 2006

 
Erected 2006 by West Virginia Division of Archives and History.
 
Location. 39° 25.598′ N, 77° 59.238′ W. Marker is in Martinsburg, West Virginia, in Berkeley County. Marker is on Winchester Avenue (U.S. 11) 0.1 miles north of Evans Run Road, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2298 Winchester Avenue, Martinsburg WV 25405, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Pack Horse Road (approx. 0.6 miles away); Major General Adam Stephen (approx. 2 miles away); Boydville (approx. 2.1 miles away); Norbourne Parish Cemetery (approx. 2.1 miles away); Old Berkeley County Jail
Fort Evans Marker (<i>wide view • looking south along US Highway 11</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 18, 2019
2. Fort Evans Marker (wide view • looking south along US Highway 11)
(approx. 2.1 miles away); Site of Belle Boyd Home (approx. 2.1 miles away); St. John's Catholic Cemetery (approx. 2.1 miles away); Old Worsted and Cassimere Mills (approx. 2.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Martinsburg.
 
Also see . . .
1. John Evans House, National Register of Historic Places Nomination #06000168. John Evans House, also known as Big Spring Farm, is located in Martinsburg, West Virginia. It was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2006. (Submitted on May 20, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 

2. Polly Van Metre Evans. Polly Van Metre married John Evans II. The fort was substantially though hastily constructed in the late spring of 1755, after the outbreak of the French and Indian War, by John Evans II. This was a stockade fort; really two forts in one. The outer defense was a stockade, the inner a block house type, built of logs with a stone foundation. It was a refuge for the settlers of this region when attacked by the Indians. On one occasion none but the women and children of the neighborhood were at the fort when it was suddenly attacked by the Indians. Polly Evans made the women load rifles and she did the shooting from one porthole after another and kept up such a raking fire on the Indians that they abandoned
Fort Evans Marker (<i>wide view from across US Highway 11 • John Evans House on right</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 18, 2019
3. Fort Evans Marker (wide view from across US Highway 11 • John Evans House on right)
the attack, supposing, from the incessant firing from the fort, that it was heavily garrisoned. (Submitted on May 20, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US CivilWars, US IndianWomen
 
John Evans House (Big Spring Farm)<br>(<i>view from near marker</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 18, 2019
4. John Evans House (Big Spring Farm)
(view from near marker)
 

More. Search the internet for Fort Evans.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on May 20, 2019. This page originally submitted on May 20, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 88 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on May 20, 2019, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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