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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hatteras in Dare County, North Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Burnside's Expedition Crossing Hatteras Bar/The Burnside Expedition at Hatteras Inlet

 
 
Burnside's Expedition Crossing Hatteras Bar Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, August 16, 2011
1. Burnside's Expedition Crossing Hatteras Bar Marker
Inscription.  
Side A:
Burnside's Expedition Crossing Hatteras Bar
On January 11, 1862, the Burnside Expedition left for Fort Monroe, Virginia destined for Hatteras Inlet 120 miles to the south. Two days later, the fleet of over eighty vessels was struck by a strong Northeaster while crossing Hatteras Bar. Reassembling the fleet in Pamlico Sound was delayed until the month's end due to frequently stormy weather. Among the ships lost were the Pocahontas, Grapeshot and City of New York. The following Regiments were transported by the fleet: the 8th, 10th and 11th Connecticut; the 21st, 23rd, 24th, 25th and 27th Massachusetts; the 6th New Hampshire; the 9th New Jersey; the 1st, 9th, 51st, 89th and 99th New York; the 48th and 51st Pennsylvania; and the 1st, 4th and 5th Rhode Island.

Side B:
The Burnside Expedition at Hatteras Island
General Burnside's forces captured Roanoke Island on February 8, 1862. In quick succession, thirteen counties and over thirty cities and towns were annexed including: New Bern, Plymouth, Beaufort, Edenton, Elizabeth City and Washington.
The Burnside Expedition at Hatteras Inlet Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, August 16, 2011
2. The Burnside Expedition at Hatteras Inlet Marker
By July of 1862 the Confederate coastal supply line from the Deep South to Virginia was deeply compromised. These events underscored the inability of the Confederacy to set priorities and the failure of the Federal leadership to recognize the full potential of their coastal conquests. The loss of the Outer Banks undermined Southern morale and boosted that of the North. It intensified the secession controversy and the conflict between the Confederate government and North Carolina.
 
Erected by Dare County Tourism Board.
 
Location. 35° 12.364′ N, 75° 42.343′ W. Marker is in Hatteras, North Carolina, in Dare County. Marker can be reached from Museum Drive 0.2 miles west of Coast Guard Road. Located at the Graveyard of the Atlantic Shipwreck Museum. Part of the Hatteras Village Guided Tour. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Hatteras NC 27943, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fort Clark/The Bombardment of Fort Hatteras (a few steps from this marker); Maritime Casualties of the American Civil War/Loss of the USS Monitor (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Flagship USS Minnesota/Hotel de Afrique (about 300 feet away); Confederate Forts (approx. mile away); America's 1st Attempt at Civil War Reunification
Burnside's Expedition Crossing Hatteras Bar Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, August 16, 2011
3. Burnside's Expedition Crossing Hatteras Bar Marker
(approx. 1.3 miles away); Mitchell Demonstrates Air Power (approx. 5 miles away); Paukenschlag (approx. 10.2 miles away); Life at the Light (approx. 10 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Hatteras.
 
Categories. War, US CivilWaterways & Vessels
 
The Burnside Expedition at Hatteras Inlet Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, August 16, 2011
4. The Burnside Expedition at Hatteras Inlet Marker
 

More. Search the internet for Burnside's Expedition Crossing Hatteras Bar/The Burnside Expedition at Hatteras Inlet.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on July 11, 2019. This page originally submitted on August 16, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 663 times since then and 54 times this year. Last updated on June 28, 2019, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on August 17, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   2. submitted on August 21, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   3. submitted on August 17, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   4. submitted on August 21, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
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