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Fort Recovery in Mercer County, Ohio — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Towards a Better Understanding / Remembering the Fallen

 
 
Towards a Better Understanding / Remembering the Fallen Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
1. Towards a Better Understanding / Remembering the Fallen Marker
Inscription.  "This splendid granite shaft, handsome in its proportions; durable in its material; permanent in its foundation and pedestal, and simple in its purity and design, we now dedicate to commemorate the last resting place of those of our heroic countrymen who fell here and are here interred..."
-Address of General J. Warren Keifer during Monument dedication on July 1, 1913

Towards a Better Understanding
The speech excerpt below and monument plaques reflect attitudes in 1913. The American Indians' efforts to protect their homelands are more fully appreciated today. Also recognized now are the U.S. government's complete disregard for American Indian treaties at that time. Words used in the past to describe American Indians, and even the monument itself with references to only U.S. losses, can be offensive to many people including American Indias. The Fort Recovery Museum strives to work with our American Indian partners to educate our patrons and visitors on current American Indian thoughts and concerns about our shared history.

Remembering the Fallen
In 1851, boys playing along
Towards a Better Understanding / Remembering the Fallen Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
2. Towards a Better Understanding / Remembering the Fallen Marker
Close-up view of four features that are displayed on this marker. The captions read as follows: Left and Center: Building the monument in 1912 and 1913, photos courtesy of Jim Wagner and the Fort Recovery Historical Society. Right; Over 900 crosses are set up each Memorial Day to honor those killed in the Battle of the Wabash (1791) and the Battle of Fort Recovery (1794). Credit: Christine Thompson.
the banks of the Wabash River discovered the bones of many of the buried soldiers from the Battle of the Wabash. The bones were exhumed, and a ceremony was held on September 10,1851, burying the remains in 13 coffins in Pioneer Cemetery. The soldiers' remains were moved to this Monument site in 1891 where they were buried and surrounded by a wood and iron enclosure for 20 years.

In 1908, President William Howard Taft authorized the building of a monument to honor the soldiers of Major General Arthur St. Clair and Major General Anthony Wayne. Construction began in early 1912. A crypt was prepared in the concrete foundation of the monument for the final internment of the remains of the fallen soldiers, allowing Monument Park to serve both as a memorial and a military cemetery. The Monument was dedicated on July 1, 1913 with several thousand people attending the ceremony. Speakers included dignitaries and local officials. The total height of the monument is over 101 feet. It is estimated that 800 tons of granite, concrete and other materials were used in the structure. The total cost in 1913 was $23,700, which is the equivalent of over a half million dollars in 2017.
 
Erected by National Park Service American Battlefield Protection Program and the State of Ohio. (Marker Number 13.)
 
Location.
Towards a Better Understanding / Remembering the Fallen Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
3. Towards a Better Understanding / Remembering the Fallen Marker
View of the marker looking east along East Boundary Street.
40° 24.814′ N, 84° 46.587′ W. Marker is in Fort Recovery, Ohio, in Mercer County. Marker is on Elm Road (Ohio Route 49) south of East Boundary Street, on the left when traveling south. This marker is located on the western boundary of the grounds of Monument Park, west of the granite memorial shaft. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Recovery OH 45846, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. St. Clair's Defeat / Fort Recovery (within shouting distance of this marker); Dr. Victor Grasson (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Recovery Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Fort Recovery Civil War Veterans Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Weaponry at the Battle of the Wabash and the Battle of Fort Recovery (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); Gen. Richard Butler (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Battle of the Wabash (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Battle of Fort Recovery (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Fort Recovery.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesNative AmericansWars, US Indian
 
Towards a Better Understanding / Remembering the Fallen Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, July 15, 2019
4. Towards a Better Understanding / Remembering the Fallen Marker
View of the marker, looking east, with Monument Park in the immediate background, and the granite shaft memorial monument in the distant background.
 

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Credits. This page was last revised on August 4, 2019. This page originally submitted on August 4, 2019, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 39 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on August 4, 2019, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.
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