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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Battle of Franklin

Cavalry in the Battle

 
 
The Battle of Franklin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 21, 2019
1. The Battle of Franklin Marker
Inscription.  On the morning of November 30, 1864, some 5,000 Federal cavalrymen under Gen. James H. Wilson were in this area. Most were located to your right front, east of the Harpeth River, but Gen. John T. Croxton’s brigade remained west of the river. By late in the morning, Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s 5,000 cavalrymen reached Franklin, and some began skirmishing with Croxton’s troopers. Forrest soon advocated crossing the Harpeth to the east in an effort to flank the main Federal army. But the Union cavalry, a Union infantry division and reserve Federal artillery pieces near Fort Granger mad any flanking movement a difficult proposition. Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood opted against Forrest’s proposal and instead ordered a frontal assault against the main Federal line.

In the Confederate cavalry attack, Gen. James R. Chalmers’s division moved against the Federal west flank one mile northwest (1.6km) to your left but was unable to achieve any success. Gen. Abraham Buford’s division moved north along Lewisburg Pike and encountered Croxton’s troopers. Buford eventually pushed them back across the river at McGavock’s Ford to your
The Battle of Franklin Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 21, 2019
2. The Battle of Franklin Marker
At the Franklin Harpeth River Access
right but had little success otherwise. About .9 miles southeast of here, Gen. William H. Jackson’s division crossed the Harpeth River at Hughes’s Ford and engaged Gen. Edward Hatch’s horsemen. After a brief but intense fight, Hatch forced Jackson’s troops back to the river’s western side. At all three points, the Federals held their flanks and enabled the remaining Union forces to concentrate against the Confederate infantry assault.

(sidebar)
Among the military units that fought at the battle of Franklin was Company F, 4th Tennessee Cavalry Regiment (CSA). That company was organized here in John McGavock’s grove in 1861.
 
Erected by Tennessee Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Tennessee Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 35° 54.55′ N, 86° 51.355′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker is on Lewisburg Pike (Business U.S. 431) west of Carriage Park Drive, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Franklin TN 37064, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Harpeth River Restoration and Fish Passage (here, next to this marker); Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Advancing With Scott's Brigade
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 21, 2019
3. Inset
Situation map
(about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Advancing With Scott's Brigade (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (approx. Ľ mile away); a different marker also named Advancing With Scott's Brigade (approx. Ľ mile away); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin, Eastern Flank (approx. Ľ mile away); a different marker also named Battle of Franklin (approx. Ľ mile away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker. "Recruiting for War" wayside on the Eastern Flank Battlefield
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 21, 2019
4. Inset
Confederate Gen. Nathan Bedford Forest often played large roles in small battles and small roles in large battles. The latter was certainly true at Franklin, where his desire for a flanking maneuver to the east was overruled by Union strength, unfavorable terrain, and Gen. John Bell Hood's order of a direct frontal assault. As a result, Forrest's men remained on the fringes of the battlefield and suffered relatively few casualties. - Library of Congress
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 21, 2019
5. Inset
In the Confederacy, Tennessee ranked first in total livestock. Early in the war, the state's vast supply of horses enabled the South to dominate cavalry operations, but by 1864 the Union controlled most of Tennessee as well as the state's supply of draft animals. As a result, Union cavalry successes increased as Southern troopers gradually pushed their own dwindling number of horses to the point of exhaustion. - Courtesy Library of Congress
 

More. Search the internet for The Battle of Franklin.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on August 30, 2019. This page originally submitted on August 28, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 59 times since then. Last updated on August 28, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on August 28, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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