Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Vischer Ferry in Saratoga County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Vischer Ferry Nature and Historic Preserve

 
 
Vischer Ferry Nature and Historic Preserve Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel, September 5, 2019
1. Vischer Ferry Nature and Historic Preserve Marker
Inscription.  In the fall of 1977, the New York State Department of Transportation and the Town of Clifton Park embarked on a unique partnership. This venture established the 600-acre historically and ecologically significant Vischer Ferry Nature and Historic Preserve. Located within the National Vischer Ferry Historic District and adjacent to the Mohawk River, the Preserve has three areas of interest: a wetland ecosystem, the remains of the Erie Canal and the site of Clifton Park's first settlement.

Farmed by Mohawk Indians prior of European settlers, the area was known as Canastigione, meaning "corn flats.” Clifton Park's first white settlers had arrived by 1672, establishing a community here on the Mohawk that became known as Fort's Ferry, after the ferry established by Nicholas Fort about 1727. This area was part of the Canastigione Land Patent of 1708 granted by Queen Anne of England which gave land to speculators.

Local residents began to be employed in 1822 digging the Erie Canal, which opened between Albany and Buffalo in 1825. The canal was so successful that it was necessary to enlarge it just ten years
Vischer Ferry Nature and Historic Preserve Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel
2. Vischer Ferry Nature and Historic Preserve Marker
later. This section of the canal was enlarged during 1841 and 1842. Clute's Dry Dock settlement is in the eastern section of the preserve, and Lock 19 and its support buildings are in the western section.

In 1907, the Mohawk River was dammed to create the locks of the Barge Canal. This made the Mohawk River navigable, but raised the water level to such an extent that annual spring floods inundated the area, forcing the abandonment of the settlements of Fort's Ferry and Clute's Dry Dock. The Erie Canal was abandoned when the Barge Canal became operational in 1917.
 
Erected by America’s Byways.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Erie Canal marker series.
 
Location. 42° 47.576′ N, 73° 47.742′ W. Marker is in Vischer Ferry, New York, in Saratoga County. Marker is at the intersection of Riverview Road and Van Vranken Road, on the right when traveling east on Riverview Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Rexford NY 12148, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Cast Iron Whipple Truss Bridge, 1869 (here, next to this marker); Whipple Iron Truss Bridge (within shouting distance of this marker); Erie Canal (within shouting distance of this marker); Clutes Dry Dock (approx.
Vischer Ferry Nature and Historic Preserve Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel
3. Vischer Ferry Nature and Historic Preserve Marker
one mile away); a different marker also named Clute’s Dry Dock (approx. one mile away); Lock 19 (approx. 1.4 miles away); Van Den Bergh (approx. 1.4 miles away); Amity Reformed Church (approx. 1.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Vischer Ferry.
 
Categories. Parks & Recreational AreasSettlements & SettlersWaterways & Vessels
 
Vischer Ferry Nature and Historic Preserve Marker image. Click for full size.
By Steve Stoessel
4. Vischer Ferry Nature and Historic Preserve Marker
 

More. Search the internet for Vischer Ferry Nature and Historic Preserve.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 9, 2019. This page originally submitted on September 5, 2019, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. This page has been viewed 30 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on September 5, 2019, by Steve Stoessel of Niskayuna, New York. • Andrew Ruppenstein was the editor who published this page.
Paid Advertisement