Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Carter Farm

The Columbia Pike

 
 
The Columbia Pike marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
1. The Columbia Pike marker
Inscription.  The Columbia Pike began as a path that bison and other animals created en route to the salt lick at present-day Nashville. Native Americans used this and other trails for hunting as well as for travel. In the 19th century, the trails formed the basis for white settlers’ developing road structures. This road was given various names depending on the location and the owner of the property that it crossed: Gidden’s Road, Brown’s Trace, Rodgers Ford Road, etc. As communities grew, tributary roads radiated from the main road to create a larger transportation system.

The Franklin and Columbia Turnpike Company, chartered in 1831, improved existing roads and erected tollbooths to collect fares for maintenance. Commonly called pikes, turnpikes were the highways of their day, some were hard surfaced, and many succumbed to the wartime beating they took from soldiers, wagons, horses, cattle, and artillery.

The Columbia Pike served as a major transportation route to Nashville, the region’s commercial center, for more than 150 years. Farmers transported their crops to Nashville’s markets on this road. The turnpike was extended south all
The Carter Gins Site and Park image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
2. The Carter Gins Site and Park
The marker is in the distance on the right.
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the way to the Gulf coast.

On November 30, 1864, the Columbia Pike, with its direct route to Nashville, brought two armies to Franklin. Union Gen. John Schofield, marching his forces toward the safety of Nashville, intended to cross the nearby Harpeth River. Finding the bridges impassible, however, he was forced to erect defenses here against the pursuing Confederate army.
 
Erected by Historic Franklin Parks.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Roads & VehiclesWar, US Civil. A significant historical date for this entry is November 30, 1864.
 
Location. 35° 54.957′ N, 86° 52.399′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker is on Columbia Avenue (Business U.S. 31) north of Cleburne Street, on the right when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Carter Gin Site and Park, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Main Entrenchment Federal Battle Line (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
3. Inset
Columbia Pike – looking south
(within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
4. Inset
Columbia Pike near Thompson’s Station, 1920
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
5. Inset
Carter Hill, from The Battle of Franklin (1897)
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
6. Inset
The Battle of Franklin
The Columbia Pike, 2019 image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 22, 2019
7. The Columbia Pike, 2019
Columbia Avenue, at the Carter House.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 12, 2019. It was originally submitted on September 10, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 106 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on September 10, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.

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Jul. 29, 2021