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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Carter Farm

The Tragic End

 
 
The Carter Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
1. The Carter Farm Marker
Inscription.  Here at Franklin in November 1864 when the hopes of 1861 seemed just a fleeting memory, the soldiers of the Army of Tennessee attacked furiously toward you across the rolling fields. A Federal officer who was here saw their “red-and-white tattered flags” flaring “brilliantly in the sun’s rays,” as if they were “phantoms sweeping through the air.” The attack soon became a full-throttled charge and the Rebel yell echoed across these fields. The Federals opened fire, and a Confederate officer recalled that it seemed as if “hell itself had exploded in our faces,” but those who survived the Union volleys briefly imagined themselves close to victory.

The Confederate troops who poured across the ground hailed from at least six Southern states. Most were young or middle-aged and most had served since at least 1862. The vast majority were poor farmers and merchants called to duty as they saw it to defend their homes and their “way of life.” Many of them perished here, on this once quiet ground, during a battle so horrible that survivors found it difficult to describe. They carried
The Carter Farm Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
2. The Carter Farm Marker
The area of the Confederate advance.
awful memories for the rest of their lives.

The Army of Tennessee often experienced initial success and then terrible failure. Such was the case here. By the time the fighting stopped, more than 2,000 Confederate troops had become casualties in this area. The bodies of the dead were heaped on one another, “piled up like snowdrifts in winter time,” as a Union artilleryman wrote. Wounded men lay strewn across the ground and hundreds were led away as prisoners, including Gen. George W. Gordon. The battle had ended in disaster.
 
Erected by Historic Franklin Parks.
 
Location. 35° 54.941′ N, 86° 52.386′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker is at the intersection of Columbia Avenue (Business U.S. 31) and Cleburne Street, on the right when traveling north on Columbia Avenue. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Cotton Gin Site and Park, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named The Carter Farm (a few steps from this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (a few steps from this marker); The Cotton Gin Assault (was within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing. ); a different marker also named The Carter Farm
Confederate dead and earthworks image. Click for full size.
By Nicholas Brown, October 4, 1862
3. Confederate dead and earthworks
Confederate dead in front of Fort Robinette, Corinth, Mississippi Library of Congress [LC-DIG-ppmsca-35455]
(within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Carter Farm (within shouting distance of this marker); Main Entrenchment Federal Battle Line (within shouting distance of this marker); Carter's Cotton Gin (was within shouting distance of this marker but has been reported missing. ). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Unidentified Confederate Tennessee soldiers image. Click for full size.
By Charles Rees, June 16, 2019
4. Unidentified Confederate Tennessee soldiers
Two unidentified soldiers from Tennessee in Confederate uniforms with rifles and pepperbox pistol
Library of Congress [LC-DIG-ppmsca-33315]
Inset image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
5. Inset
Gen. George W. Gordon, PoW
The Cotton Gin Site and Park image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 16, 2019
6. The Cotton Gin Site and Park
A wide view of the battlefield. The mulched line follows the line of entrenchments.
 

More. Search the internet for The Carter Farm.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on September 20, 2019. This page originally submitted on September 20, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 57 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on September 20, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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