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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Tusayan in Coconino County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

The Tusayan Lookout Tree

Early Fire Detection on the Kaibab National Forest

 
 
The Tusayan Lookout Tree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel
1. The Tusayan Lookout Tree Marker
Inscription.  The Tusayan Lookout Tree is an example of one of the earliest fire detection systems in American history.
Early rangers were tasked with keeping the forest safe, especially from wild fire. With little funding and no staff, rangers would simply venture to the highest point on the landscape and look for fires.
A ranger or fire guard would lop off the top of a tree and fit it with a platform complete with a railing, a chair, a telephone, a map board and a compass.
By 1905, rangers were modifying trees with good views of the landscape into lookout trees. A person known as a lookout staffed the tree and located fires on the ground. A patrolman known as a smoke chaser would head off in the direction of the blaze and put it out.
The Kaibab used lookout trees from 1905 through the 1940s. By the 1930s wooden and steel towers replaced many lookout trees. The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), a government sponsored work force under President Franklin D. Roosevelt, constructed many of the towers on the Kaibab National Forest.
 
Erected by Arizona Public Service Company and the United States Forest
The Tusayan Lookout Tree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel
2. The Tusayan Lookout Tree Marker
lower left photo
Early 1900s lookout on Bill Williams
Service.
 
Location. 35° 58.213′ N, 112° 8.231′ W. Marker is in Tusayan, Arizona, in Coconino County. Marker can be reached from Fire Road 2607 0.2 miles west of Long Jim Loop Road. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Grand Canyon AZ 86023, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Albright Training Center History (approx. 5.6 miles away); Mission 66 (approx. 5.6 miles away); Horace M. Albright (approx. 5.6 miles away); Blacksmith Shop (approx. 5.9 miles away); Mule Barns (approx. 5.9 miles away); Grand Canyon Depot (approx. 6 miles away); Santa Fe Depot (approx. 6 miles away); Bright Angel Lodge (approx. 6 miles away).
 
Also see . . .  Kaibab Lookout Trees. (Submitted on October 20, 2019, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. EnvironmentParks & Recreational Areas
 
The Tusayan Lookout Tree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel
3. The Tusayan Lookout Tree Marker
center photo
Hull Tank Lookout Tree and two unknown men (1916)
The Tusayan Lookout Tree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel
4. The Tusayan Lookout Tree Marker
lower right photo
Man constructing a tower on the Forest (1930)
The Tusayan Lookout Tree Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel
5. The Tusayan Lookout Tree Marker
The Tusayan Lookout Tree image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel
6. The Tusayan Lookout Tree
Lookout platform in tree
 

More. Search the internet for The Tusayan Lookout Tree.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 20, 2019. This page originally submitted on October 20, 2019, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 52 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on October 20, 2019, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
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