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Franklin in Williamson County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Unknown Civil War Soldier

 
 
Unknown Civil War Soldier Marker (front) image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 22, 2019
1. Unknown Civil War Soldier Marker (front)
Inscription.  Front:
In 2009, a construction project along Columbia Pike 2.5 miles south of here unearthed human bone fragments, in an area that was part of the Franklin battlefield. Forensic anthropologists determined that these were the remains of a Civil War soldier. Also found among the remains were six Union tunic buttons and a Minie ball, although it was impossible to verify conclusively if the soldier was Union or Confederate. Accordingly, he was designated an Unknown Civil War Soldier, an American who had died for his country. He is buried here at the center of Rest Haven Cemetery.

Back:
On Oct. 10, 2009, the community of Franklin honored this Unknown Civil War Soldier with a period military funeral at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church. After the service, a horse-drawn caisson and honor guard carried the coffin here. Several thousand spectators and national media were in attendance, as scores of reenactors conduced a burial, and upon the grave they poured soil from the 18 states represented at the Battle of Franklin. Also present were two actual sons and daughters of Civil War veterans.

Marking the grave are original column
Unknown Civil War Soldier Marker (back) image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 22, 2019
2. Unknown Civil War Soldier Marker (back)
sections from the Tennessee State Capitol (1856), which now stand in remembrance of all unknown soldiers of the American Civil War. May these fallen soldiers rest in peace.
 
Erected 2010 by Franklin Battlefield Commission.
 
Location. 35° 55.681′ N, 86° 52.415′ W. Marker is in Franklin, Tennessee, in Williamson County. Marker is on 4th Avenue North north of North Margin Street, on the left when traveling north. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: Rest Haven Cemetery, Franklin TN 37064, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Rest Haven Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); City Cemetery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Maury-Darby Building (approx. 0.3 miles away); 430 Main Street (approx. 0.3 miles away); 432-438 Main Street (approx. 0.3 miles away); Franklin Downtown Historic District (approx. 0.3 miles away); Nashville-Franklin Interurban (approx. 0.3 miles away); Presbyterian Church (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Franklin.
 
Also see . . .
1. Unknown Soldier ceremonies plan of the day. (Submitted on October 23, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.)
2. Unknown Soldier procession. (Submitted on October 23, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York.)
 
Categories.
Unknown Civil War Soldier Marker image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 22, 2019
3. Unknown Civil War Soldier Marker
Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
Unknown Civil War Soldier gravesite image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 22, 2019
4. Unknown Civil War Soldier gravesite
The original column sections from the Tennessee State Capitol.
Unknown Civil War Soldier headstone image. Click for full size.
By Larry Gertner, June 22, 2019
5. Unknown Civil War Soldier headstone
Unknown Civil War Soldier image. Click for full size.
Unknown, From Video Clip, October 10, 2009
6. Unknown Civil War Soldier
The coffin was covered by both United States and Confederate States flags.
 

More. Search the internet for Unknown Civil War Soldier.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 23, 2019. This page originally submitted on October 23, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. This page has been viewed 46 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on October 23, 2019, by Larry Gertner of New York, New York. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page.
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