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Kenilworth Park in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Victoria amazonica

Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens

 

National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior

 
<i>Victoria amazonica</i> Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, October 27, 2019
1. Victoria amazonica Marker
Inscription.  Of all the water lilies grown at Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens, the Victoria amazonica (formerly named Victoria regia), Victoria cruziana, and the hybrid, Victoria 'longwood' are among the most popular.

These lilies are night-blooming. Flowers grow to over 12 inches wide and bloom in early September. In their native South America, the lily pads may grow and inch per hour and reach up to eight feet in diameter. Here, the pads typically grow as large as four to six feet.

For over 200 years, the Victoria amazonica has fascinated explorers and nobility alike, as one of the great exotic plants of the Amazon.

The Victoria amazonica helped spark worldwide interest in water lilies during the 1800s. This magnificent plant appears in the Shaw Gardens' catalogs from the early 20th Century.

[Asides:]
A Water Lily Fit for a Queen

Named after the British monarch Queen Victoria, Victoria regia is widely considered to be the "Queen of Aquatics."

German/English explorer Robert Schomburgk popularized the Victoria
<i>Victoria amazonica</i> Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, October 27, 2019
2. Victoria amazonica Marker
regia
when he sent water lily specimens to England from British Guiana, present-day Guyana, South American in 1837.

British botanist John Lindley published the first description of the plant and named it after the new queen.

The lily was renamed the Victoria amazonica in 1901, after the death of Queen Victoria.

Victoria regia
Grown at the White House


In 1903, First Lady Edith Roosevelt wrote:
"Water gardens are a new fad. . .
It is intended by next year to
grow the wonderful
Victoria regia
in the great basin to the south of
the executive mansion."

 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 54.795′ N, 76° 56.69′ W. Marker is in Kenilworth Park, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker can be reached from Anacostia Avenue Northeast 0.1 miles west of Ponds Street Northeast, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1550 Anacostia Avenue Northeast, Washington DC 20019, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Under the Boardwalk (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Beauty and Business (about 500 feet away); Aquatic Greenhouse #3 (about 800
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feet away); Preserve and Protect (approx. 0.2 miles away); Helen Shaw Fowler (approx. 0.2 miles away); Aquatic Greenhouse #1 (approx. 0.2 miles away); Display Pools (approx. 0.2 miles away); Birds, Wetlands and... Conservation (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Kenilworth Park.
 
Categories. EnvironmentHorticulture & ForestryWomen
 

More. Search the internet for Victoria amazonica.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 27, 2019. This page originally submitted on October 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 40 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
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