Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Kenilworth Park in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Birds, Wetlands and... Conservation

Kenilworth Aquatic Gardens

 

National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior

 
Birds, Wetlands and... Conservation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, October 27, 2019
1. Birds, Wetlands and... Conservation Marker
Inscription.  Anacostia River tidal marshes were far more extensive a hundred years ago than today. Marshes support amphibians, small fish and insects. This abundant aquatic life attracts herons, egrets, rails and other birds to feed. Over-hunting and draining of the wetland caused the decline of many bird species along the river.

People dedicated to changing this trend included Paul Bartsch, a local bird watcher, conservationist and professor at George Washington University. The Smithsonian Institution published his study, Herons of the Anacostia, in 1903.

Angry about losing so many birds to hunting, he and the National Audubon Society successfully lobbied Congress to pass some of the first nationwide laws protecting birds.

Conservation
The National Park Service, local governments and non-profit organizations continue restoring wetlands along the Anacostia River. As a result, many herons and egrets have returned.

Effects are felt far beyond the Anacostia watershed as migratory birds use these wetlands as a stopover on their journeys.

[Aside:]
Former Hunting Grounds

During
Birds, Wetlands and... Conservation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, October 27, 2019
2. Birds, Wetlands and... Conservation Marker
the late summers of the 19th and early 20th centuries, sportsmen regularly spent afternoons bird shooting in the marsh. Often, they would hire local African American guides, who operated skiffs and new the river well, to take them hunting in the wetlands.

An eyewitness described the scene on August 22, 1900:
"The marsh was alive with crafts of all kinds plying through the tangle of maze and lily pads and host of other marsh-loving plants and bang, bang, bang, rang the guns continuously."

 
Erected by National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 38° 54.717′ N, 76° 56.902′ W. Marker is in Kenilworth Park, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Anacostia Avenue Northeast 0.2 miles west of Ponds Street Northeast, on the right when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1550 Anacostia Avenue Northeast, Washington DC 20019, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Under the Boardwalk (about 800 feet away, measured in a direct line); Victoria amazonica (approx. 0.2 miles away); Beauty and Business (approx. 0.3 miles away); Aquatic Greenhouse #3 (approx. 0.3 miles away); Preserve and Protect (approx. 0.3 miles away);
Paid Advertisement
Click on the ad for more information.
Please report objectionable advertising to the Editor.
Helen Shaw Fowler (approx. 0.4 miles away); Aquatic Greenhouse #1 (approx. 0.4 miles away); Display Pools (approx. 0.4 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Kenilworth Park.
 
Categories. EnvironmentParks & Recreational AreasScience & MedicineSports
 

More. Search the internet for Birds, Wetlands and... Conservation.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on October 27, 2019. This page originally submitted on October 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 39 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on October 27, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.
Paid Advertisement