Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Atlanta in Fulton County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Battle of Ezra Church

Hood's Third Attack

 

— Atlanta Campaign Heritage Trail —

 
Battle of Ezra Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 10, 2019
1. Battle of Ezra Church Marker
Inscription.  After General John Bell Hood took command of the the army defending Atlanta he directed three Confederate failed attacks against Union Major General William T. Sherman's armies. On July 28, 1864, Union Major General Oliver O. Howard's "Army of the Tennessee" moved south with the goal of cutting the last railroad lines supplying Atlanta. Sensing impending battle, Howard's 15th Corps halted near Ezra Church, a Methodist chapel. The 17th Corps soon arrived to extend the line. In most places the Federals were entrenched. On open ground near the church some soldiers erected barricades using church pews.

General Hood sent the corps of Lieutenant General Stephen Dill Lee, his least experienced corps commander, west from Atlanta. Lieutenant General Alexander P. Stewart's corps followed Lees. The Confederates marched along Lick Skillet Road (Ralph David Abernathy Boulevard) with orders to halt the Federal advance. Yet they were "not to attack unless the enemy exposes himself in attacking us."

When General Lee's corps arrived he imprudently attacked with two divisions against Howard's strong line and was shattered. The musketry was so

Battle of Ezra Church Marker with other Georgia Historical Commission markers on the battle. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 10, 2019
2. Battle of Ezra Church Marker with other Georgia Historical Commission markers on the battle.
fierce a Federal officer wrote "no mortal could stand." General Stewart then sent Major General Edward Walthall's division forward, trampling on the bodies of Lee's casualties. The result was the same. In Walthall's opinion, "Double the force could not have accomplished what my division was ordered to undertake."

After the battle a Federal picket called out, "Well, Johnny, how many of you are left?" The despondent Confederate replied, "Oh, about enough for another killing." The movement of General Sherman's armies to the south around Atlanta was temporarily halted but at a heavy cost.
 
Erected by Georgia Civil War Heritage Trails, Inc. (Marker Number 35.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 33° 45.201′ N, 84° 26.225′ W. Marker is in Atlanta, Georgia, in Fulton County. Marker can be reached from M.L.K. Jr Drive SW east of Wellington Street SW, on the left when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1565 MLK Jr Dr SW, Atlanta GA 30314, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Site of Ezra Church (was a few steps from this marker but has been reported missing. ); The Confederate Attack (a few steps from this marker); The Union Dispositions

Battle of Ezra Church GHC Markers image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 10, 2019
3. Battle of Ezra Church GHC Markers
(a few steps from this marker); The Battle of Ezra Church / The Preliminary Operations (a few steps from this marker); Battle Hill (was a few steps from this marker but has been reported missing. ); The Federal Salient (was approx. ¼ mile away but has been reported missing. ); Clayton's Div., Lee's A.C. (approx. ¼ mile away); a different marker also named Clayton’s Div., Lee’s A.C. (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Atlanta.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia article on the Battle of Ezra Church. (Submitted on November 11, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.)
 
Categories. Churches & ReligionWar, US Civil
 
Battle of Ezra Church Battlefield Map image. Click for full size.
By Public domain, June 23, 2010
4. Battle of Ezra Church Battlefield Map
Map by the American Battlefield Protection Program of the National Park Service.
 

More. Search the internet for Battle of Ezra Church.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 29, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 11, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 62 times since then and 9 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 11, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
Paid Advertisement