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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Scotia in Humboldt County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Wi'ne'ma Theatre

"Women of the Braveheart"

 
 
Wi'ne'ma Theatre Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, November 17, 2019
1. Wi'ne'ma Theatre Marker
Inscription.  The Wi'ne'ma Theatre was built in 1919 and named for a young Indian girl who devoted her life to establishing friendly relations between her people, the Modoc Indians, and the white men. The first performance was on November 20, 1920 and tells the story of Wi'ne'ma, the theatres namesake.

Designed by Architect, Alfred Henry Jacobs, it was to be a place of friendly assemblage, blended with its magnificent surroundings, not to be commercial in nature, in essence to be more than just a theatre to the community.

A redwood architectural marvel, originally had seating for 600 patrons. It is 128 feet long, 58 feet wide and 45 feet high.

Spared from fire in 1992 and renovated in 2000-2002 with new seating, lights, sound system and 2000 square foot dance floor. The Wi'ne'ma Theatre has constantly been used as a place of friendly assemblage and pride of the Scotia Community.


 
Erected 2007 by Native Sons of the Golden West Grand Parlor.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Native Sons/Daughters of the Golden West marker series.
 
Location.

Wi'ne'ma Theatre Marker - wide view image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, November 17, 2019
2. Wi'ne'ma Theatre Marker - wide view
40° 29.05′ N, 124° 6.143′ W. Marker is in Scotia, California, in Humboldt County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street and Church Street, on the right when traveling west on Main Street. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 116 Main Street, Scotia CA 95565, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 11 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Scotia Museum (within shouting distance of this marker); The Pacific Lumber Company (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Sam Helwer (approx. 4.2 miles away); Humboldt Redwoods State Park (approx. 4.8 miles away); The Eel River Starts on Your Street (approx. 7 miles away); Fernbridge (approx. 10 miles away); Ferndale Cemetery (approx. 10 miles away); Joseph C. Oeschger Field (approx. 10.6 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Scotia.
 
Also see . . .  Winema and the Modoc War (Prologue Magazine, Spring 2005). (Submitted on November 20, 2019.)
 
Categories. ArchitectureEntertainmentNative AmericansWomen
 
Wi'ne'ma Theatre and Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, November 17, 2019
3. Wi'ne'ma Theatre and Marker
Winema image. Click for full size.
Charles Milton Bell (courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution), circa 1875
4. Winema
"Winema earned her adult name-which means "strong-hearted woman" - for an act of bravery at age fourteen....when tensions between the Modoc and U.S. authorities escalated during the early 1870s, she stepped forward to serve as an interpreter and later a mediator between the two sides. Although warfare ultimately broke out, she earned widespread recognition for saving the life of a government official who came west to negotiate a peace settlement. Following the conclusion of the Modoc War, Winema traveled to Washington, D.C., where she met President Ulysses S. Grant and attended a parade held in her honor." - National Portrait Gallery
 

More. Search the internet for Wi'ne'ma Theatre.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 20, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 20, 2019, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 51 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on November 20, 2019, by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California.
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