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Dalton in Whitfield County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Dalton Confederate Cemetery

Honored in Death

 

Atlanta Campaign Heritage Trail

 
Dalton Confederate Cemetery Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 19, 2019
1. Dalton Confederate Cemetery Marker
Inscription.  This cemetery was established during the Civil War on about four and one-half acres of Dalton's original ten-acre cemetery donated to the city by Duff Green on February 15, 1855. Today this much larger cemetery is known as West Hill. Over four hundred Confederate and four Federal soldiers, many of whom died in Dalton's military hospitals, now rest here. West Hill is also the final resting place of Confederate Brigadier General Bryan M. Thomas. A native of Milledgeville, Georgia and graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point, New York, Thomas lived in Dalton after the Civil War.

A veteran of many Western Theater battles, during the latter years of his life he served as superintendent of Dalton's public schools. Names of the Confederate soldiers buried here are inscribed on the Memorial Wall of gray Georgia granite erected by the General Joseph E. Johnston Camp #671, Sons of Confederate Veterans (S.C.V.), the Civil War Roundtable of Dalton, and the Private Drewry R. Smith Chapter #2522, United Daughters of the Confederacy (U.D.C.). It was dedicated on April 24, 1999.

During the war

This marker, the cemetery, another marker about the cemetery & the Confederate Monument. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 19, 2019
2. This marker, the cemetery, another marker about the cemetery & the Confederate Monument.
Dalton, located along the Western and Atlantic Railroad, connecting Chattanooga with Atlanta, was an accessible destination for transporting sick and wounded Confederate soldiers from distant battlefields. Many arrived by railroad after the 1862 and 1863 battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Stones River, Chickamauga and Chattanooga. Among the first soldiers to die in Dalton were Corporal John G. Reynolds, Company E, 20th Alabama Volunteer Infantry Regiment, on April 20, 1862, and Corporal John A. McBryde, Company H, 23rd Alabama Volunteer Infantry Regiment, on June 17, 1862. The Oliver Hospital, opening in July 1862, was the first Confederate hospital in Dalton. The hospital is believed to have been named for John P. Oliver who owned the building it first occupied. Nine additional hospitals opened in Dalton during 1863 and early 1864. Smallpox and other diseases also took their toll on the hospitalized men. All hospitals closed or moved farther south before Dalton was occupied by Union Major General William T. Sherman's army on May 13, 1864.

The first Confederate Memorial Day service held here was led by the ladies of Dalton on April 26, 1866, the first anniversary of Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston's surrender in North Carolina to General Sherman. Veterans and their sons later planted beautiful oak trees to provide shade for the services. The

Stone noting the 421 unknown soldiers buried here. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 19, 2019
3. Stone noting the 421 unknown soldiers buried here.
Bryan M. Thomas Chapter #188, U.D.C., was organized in 1897 and continued the memorial tradition until the 1980s. Other groups, including the aforementioned organizations and the Whitfield-Murray Historical Society, have since participated.

The granite grave markers erected in 1900 by the Bryan M. Thomas Chapter, U.D.C., replaced the original wooden headboards. The ladies of the U.D.C. also acquired the wrought iron fence surrounding the cemetery. The Soldiers Memorial Statue, first erected in 1892, was moved to the Confederate Cemetery in 1976 when Thornton Avenue in downtown Dalton was widened. Future generations will come pay tribute to their fallen countrymen buried here.
 
Erected 2019 by Georgia Civil War Heritage Trails, Inc. (Marker Number 11.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 34° 46.097′ N, 84° 58.75′ W. Marker is in Dalton, Georgia, in Whitfield County. Marker can be reached from Evans Whitener Drive south of General Thomas Drive, on the left when traveling north. Located within Whitfield Memorial Gardens Cemetery. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 710 West Cuyler Street, Dalton GA 30720, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Confederate Cemetery (here, next to this marker);

Some of the unknown solider grave markers and the Confederate Monument. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 19, 2019
4. Some of the unknown solider grave markers and the Confederate Monument.
Dalton Confederate Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Campaign for Atlanta: Johnston's Review (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Blunt House (approx. 0.4 miles away); George Whitefield (approx. half a mile away); The McCarty Neighborhood (approx. 0.6 miles away); Tristam Dalton (approx. 0.6 miles away); Joseph E. Johnston Memorial (approx. 0.7 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Dalton.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
The U.D.C. Confederate Monument mentioned on the marker. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 19, 2019
5. The U.D.C. Confederate Monument mentioned on the marker.
Memorial listing names of the Confederate soldiers buried here. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, November 19, 2019
6. Memorial listing names of the Confederate soldiers buried here.
 

More. Search the internet for Dalton Confederate Cemetery.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 23, 2019. This page originally submitted on November 23, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 71 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on November 23, 2019, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.
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