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Owings Mills in Baltimore County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Trentham Mansion

Preserving a Family Legacy

 
 
Trentham Mansion Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), November 28, 2019
1. Trentham Mansion Marker
Inscription.  
"...preservation is simply having the good sense to hold on to things that are well designed, that link with our past in a meaningful way, and that have plenty of good use left in them."
Richard Moe, National Trust for Historic Preservation

Baltimore County was a sparsely inhabited wilderness when Reverend Thomas Cradock and his wife Catherine established "Trentham" in 1747. They were the first of multiple generations that called this estate home until 1971.

The stone buildings, walls and gates you see around you tell a story about the lives of the Cradock family and others who lived and worked here. They are tangible examples of the past and contribute to the understanding of Baltimore County's history.

Expanding development changed the landscape from rural to suburban which caused many large farms and estates to shrink and sometimes disappear. By preserving "Trentham", future generations have the chance to learn and understand the story of the Cradock family, an important part of Baltimore County's heritage.

[Captions:]
"Trentham" as depicted on
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the 1915 Bromley Atlas of Baltimore County - The several hundred acre property once contained a tavern, doctor's shop, farm buildings and an orchard.

After being incorporated into the Queen Anne Village complex, "Trentham" and its surviving outbuildings were among the first landmarks designated by the Baltimore County Landmarks Preservation Commission in 1978.

Stone and frame buildings that survived into the 21st century, including this tenant house and spring house, were lost through demolition and development.

 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: AgricultureArchitectureColonial EraIndustry & CommerceScience & MedicineSettlements & Settlers. A significant historical year for this entry is 1747.
 
Location. 39° 24.075′ N, 76° 44.943′ W. Marker is in Owings Mills, Maryland, in Baltimore County. Marker can be reached from Village Queen Drive, 0.1 miles west of Cradock Lane, on the left when traveling west. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 135 Village Queen Drive, Owings Mills MD 21117, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Trentham (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Garrison Forest Church (approx. 1˝ miles away); In Memory of William Maxwell Wood, MD (approx. 1.6 miles away);
Trentham Mansion Marker image. Click for full size.
Photographed By Devry Becker Jones (CC0), November 28, 2019
2. Trentham Mansion Marker
The Old Court Road (approx. 2.1 miles away); Hodgepodge Lodge for a New Generation (approx. 2.3 miles away); The Old United States Arsenal (approx. 2.3 miles away); Sudbrook Park (approx. 2.7 miles away); VFW War Memorial (approx. 2.8 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Owings Mills.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on November 28, 2019. It was originally submitted on November 28, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 333 times since then and 37 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on November 28, 2019, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.

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Apr. 13, 2024