Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Oxon Hill in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Addison Family at National Harbor

 
 
Addison Family at National Harbor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 1, 2020
1. Addison Family at National Harbor Marker
Inscription.  
Bird's Eye View of Alexandria, 1863
Ships that docked at Alexandria's bustling wharves carried tobacco all over the world and brought fine goods from Europe for wealthy Maryland planters.

Addison Family at National Harbor

Colonel John Addison, who emigrated from England to Maryland in 1667, acquired several thousand acres of land along the Potomac River. Addison acquired the tract of land known as St. Elizabeth's in 1692 and built an earthfast structure on this site.

After John Addison's death in 1705 or 1706, his son Thomas Addison inherited his property and began construction of substantial brick house that was completed in 1710 (18PR175). At the time of its construction, the Oxon Hill Manor plantation was one of the most luxurious homes in the region. The house was home to five generations of the Addison family. Walter Dulaney (sometimes spelled Dulany) Addison, the great-grandson of Thomas Addison, inherited Oxon Hill at the age of five. He later served as a minister of the Episcopal Church and lived a simple and pious lifestyle. In 1810, the Reverent Walter Addison
Addison Family at National Harbor Marker image. Click for full size.
By Devry Becker Jones, January 1, 2020
2. Addison Family at National Harbor Marker
sold Oxon Hill Manner and 1,300 adjoining acres to Zachariah Berry. The manor house remained one of the finest homes along the Potomac River until it burned in 1895.

Prominent Addison figures include Colonel John Addison (1634-1705/6) who was a member of the Council of Maryland (1692-93) and a founder of St. John's Episcopal Church, Broad Creek; Colonel Thomas Addison (1679-1727) first county surveyor for Prince George's County (1696) and judge (1712); and Rev. Walter Dulaney Addison (1796-1848) first ordained Episcopal priest in Prince George's County and founder and rector of St. John's Church in Georgetown. Rev. Addison was a staunch opponent of dueling and slavery.

The Addisons were prominent landowners and merchants throughout Prince George's County and have been involved in all aspects of the community. Other prominent properties in Prince George's County owned or associated with the Addison family include: Salubria Plantation (PG:80-2); St. John's Episcopal Church, Broad Creek (PG:80-7); and St. Barnabas Episcopal Church (PG79-57). Many heirs of the Addison family still reside in Prince George's County.

Oxon Hill Manor House Foundations
Archaeological excavations on this site conducted in the 1980s revealed the remains of the manor house and numerous outbuildings.

Current location of the Addison family
Map of Colonial Land Patents image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 2, 2020
3. Map of Colonial Land Patents
Prepared by Louise J. Hienton in 1972. St. Elizabeth parcel is highlighted.
Close-up of map on marker
plot at St. John's Church

On October 26, 2017 the Addison family cemetery originally located on Oxon Hill Manor was relocated to St. John's Church, Broad Creek (PG:80-7).
 
Erected by National Harbor.
 
Location. 38° 47.821′ N, 77° 0.222′ W. Marker is in Oxon Hill, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on MGM National Avenue just west of Oxon Hill Road, on the right when traveling east. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Oxon Hill MD 20745, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Hanson (here, next to this marker); Free African Americans of Oxon Hill (here, next to this marker); "Salubria" (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named John Hanson (approx. ¼ mile away); Judah and Resistance (approx. ¼ mile away); Salubria Changed the Future of the Potomac Valley (approx. ¼ mile away); Slavery in the Potomac Valley (approx. 0.3 miles away); Dr. John H. Bayne: A Leader In His Community (approx. 0.3 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oxon Hill.
 
Categories. Anthropology & ArchaeologyCemeteries & Burial SitesChurches & ReligionColonial EraSettlements & Settlers
 
Colonel Thomas Addison image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 2, 2020
4. Colonel Thomas Addison
Addison Gallery of American Art Phillips Academy.
Close-up of image on marker
Sketch of Oxon Hill Manor image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 2, 2020
5. Sketch of Oxon Hill Manor
Close-up of image on marker
Oxon Hill Fire image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 2, 2020
6. Oxon Hill Fire

Destruction of an Historic Mansion in Prince George’s County.

(Special Dispatch to the Baltimore San.)

Alexandria, Va. Feb. 6. — Another one of Maryland's historic mansions has been destroyed. The spacious dwelling-house on Oxon Hill overlooking the Potomac in Prince George’s County Opposite Alexandria, caught fire In last night and was left a wreck by the flames at daybreak this morning.

This mansion has long been one of the landmarks of the neighborhood of Washington. It was built about 1750 by Rev. Addison, an Oxford man, and with the mansions of Mt. Vernon, Belvoir and the Carlisle House on the Virginia side of the Potomac River, made up the noted mansions of the neighborhood in colonial days. The Oxon Hill estate gave its name to Oxon River one of the streams of Prince George’s county. The mansion passed from the Addison family into the hands of the late Thomas Berry, and had lately been sold.

Baltimore Sun article on the fire that destroyed Oxon Hill Manor in 1895.
Close-up of image on marker
Walter Dulany Addison image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 2, 2020
7. Walter Dulany Addison
Close-up of image on marker
Suburbia Plantation image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, January 2, 2020
8. Suburbia Plantation
This misspelling is most likely what linguists call a “cupertino”, an errant auto-correction substituting a common word, “Suburbia”, for an uncommon one, “Salubria”.
 

More. Search the internet for Addison Family at National Harbor.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 15, 2020. This page originally submitted on January 1, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia. This page has been viewed 61 times since then. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 1, 2020, by Devry Becker Jones of Washington, District of Columbia.   3, 4, 5. submitted on January 6, 2020, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   6, 7, 8. submitted on January 9, 2020, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.
Paid Advertisement