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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”

Near Shonto in Navajo County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Utah Juniper

Juniperus osteosperma

 
 
Utah Juniper Marker image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2016
1. Utah Juniper Marker
Inscription.  This tree had many uses. Many of the roof beams in Betatakin are juniper. Fires were started with juniper fire-drills, the shredded bark was used for tinder, and the wood was used for fuel. The shredded bark also served as diaper pads, was braided into rope, and was coiled into rings to support pottery jars. A brew from the leaves was used by the Hopis as a laxative, and in times of want the berries were eaten.
 
Location. 36° 40.81′ N, 110° 32.08′ W. Marker is near Shonto, Arizona, in Navajo County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Arizona Route 564 and County Route 221. Marker is located along the Sandal Trail, about 1/2 mile northeast of the Navajo National Monument Visitor Center. Touch for map. Marker is in this post office area: Shonto AZ 86054, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Mormon Tea (a few steps from this marker); Broadleaf Yucca (within shouting distance of this marker); Prehistoric Pioneers (within shouting distance of this marker); Voices in the Canyon (within shouting distance of this marker); Into The Memory
Utah Juniper Marker • <i>tall view<br>(Utah Juniper in background)</i> image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2016
2. Utah Juniper Marker • tall view
(Utah Juniper in background)
(within shouting distance of this marker); Cliffrose (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Pinyon Pine (about 600 feet away); Roundleaf Buffaloberry (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Shonto.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Sandal Trail, Navajo National Monument
 
Also see . . .  Juniperus osteosperma (Wikipedia). Native Americans such as the Havasupai used the bark for a variety of purposes, including beds, and ate the cones both fresh and in cakes. The Havasupai used the gum to make a protective covering over wounds. Additionally, the Yavapai gave their women a tea made from the leaves to calm their contractions after giving birth, and fumigated them with smoke from the leaves placed over hot coals. The Navajo sweep their tracks with boughs from the trees so death will not follow them. (Submitted on January 13, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.) 
 
Categories. Anthropology & ArchaeologyNative Americans
 
Utah Juniper Marker  <i>wide view<br>(Utah Juniper bark detail in background)</i> image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2016
3. Utah Juniper Marker wide view
(Utah Juniper bark detail in background)
Utah Juniper<br>(<i>Juniperus osteosperma</i>) image. Click for full size.
By Cosmos Mariner, May 24, 2016
4. Utah Juniper
(Juniperus osteosperma)
 

More. Search the internet for Utah Juniper.
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 13, 2020. This page originally submitted on January 12, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida. This page has been viewed 33 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 13, 2020, by Cosmos Mariner of Cape Canaveral, Florida.
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