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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oxford in Calhoun County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Choccolocco Creek Archaeological Complex

Alabama Indigenous Mound Trail

 
 
The Choccolocco Creek Archaeological Complex Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 26, 2020
1. The Choccolocco Creek Archaeological Complex Marker
Inscription.  Centered around Boiling Spring, the Choccolocco Creek Archaeological Complex once consisted of at least three earthen mounds, a large stone mound, and a large snake effigy (representation) also made of stone. The largest earthen mound once stood high above the Choccolocco Creek floodplain. The earliest mound construction began during the Middle Woodland period (ca. 100 BC to AD 250) when the site became a regionally important ritual center associated with peoples from the Gulf Coast to the Tennessee Valley. Mound construction appears to have resumed around AD 1100 when the inhabitants of this area were closely connected with the people of the Etowah site near Cartersville, Georgia.

Prior to the 1830s, this site was the location of the ceremonial ground of the Abihkas, one of the most ancient tribal towns within the modern Muscogee (Creek) Nation. Ethnographic research conducted by the Smithsonian Institution indicates that the stone constructions are associated with oral histories that tell of a town "lost in the water." The large stone mound is thought to be the result of "burden" stones carried by the Abihka

The Choccolocco Creek Archaeological Complex Marker with rebuilt mound in background. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 26, 2020
2. The Choccolocco Creek Archaeological Complex Marker with rebuilt mound in background.
This mound was reconstructed on the site of an earthwork that was bulldozed in the 1950's.
Click or scan to see
this page online
in remembrance of those lost in a great flood.

This site is very important to numerous Southeastern indigenous tribes who assert an ancestral connection with those who built and occupied Alabama's ancient mounds. The earthwork landscapes and the objects and information recovered from them reveal a rich cultural tradition that still thrives today among these tribes. Our indigenous mound sites represent a heritage for all Alabamians to cherish, and it is important that we protect and preserve them for future generations.

How do you celebrate your ancestors?
 
Erected 2018 by City of Oxford, Choccolocco Park, University of Alabama’s Center for Economic Development, the University of Alabama Museums.
 
Topics. This historical marker is listed in these topic lists: Anthropology & ArchaeologyNative AmericansSettlements & Settlers.
 
Location. 33° 36.195′ N, 85° 47.476′ W. Marker is in Oxford, Alabama, in Calhoun County. Marker can be reached from Leon Smith Parkway. Located within Choccolocco Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 954 Leon Smith Parkway, Oxford AL 36203, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Mississippi Earthen Mounds (here, next to this marker); Mississippi Agriculture (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line);

Marker, rebuilt mound and walking trails. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 26, 2020
3. Marker, rebuilt mound and walking trails.
Archaic (about 700 feet away); Reconstructing the Cultural Landscape (about 700 feet away); Muscogee (Creek) Nation (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Muscogee (Creek) Nation (about 700 feet away); a different marker also named Muscogee (Creek) Nation (about 800 feet away); The Prehistoric, Protohistoric & Historic Periods (approx. 0.2 miles away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oxford.
 
Entrance sign to the Chocolocco Park. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 26, 2020
4. Entrance sign to the Chocolocco Park.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 27, 2020. It was originally submitted on January 27, 2020, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 110 times since then and 16 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on January 27, 2020, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

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Apr. 23, 2021