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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Oxford in Calhoun County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

Muscogee (Creek) Nation

AD 1730 to AD 1832

 

— Choccolocco Park Interpretive Trail —

 
Muscogee (Creek) Nation Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 26, 2020
1. Muscogee (Creek) Nation Marker
Inscription.  By AD 1730, the English, French and Spanish had all established colonies in the region. It was also around this time that the people within the Coosa, Tallapoosa and Chattahoochee Valleys, known to history as the Arbekas (Abihkas), Tallapoosas, and Coweetas, formed an alliance, known as the Creek Confederacy. This confederacy consisted of dozens of individual tribal towns that would later become known as the Muscogee (Creek) Nation. The Europeans and Americans referred to these people collectively as the “Creek Indians.” The Muscogee people of the region struggled to live with the newcomers. They made several land cessions in an effort to live in peace even before the Creek Indian War of 1813-1814. Each land cession, however, shrank the amount of land available for the Muscogee people to pursue their traditional way of life. After the war's end, both hostile and friendly Muscogee were forced to cede all of their land west of the Coosa River to the United States. Only the mountain and hill country regions of Georgia and Alabama remained in Muscogee hands. In 1828, gold was discovered in northwest Georgia and the region
Muscogee (Creek) Nation Marker looking east towards entrance. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, January 26, 2020
2. Muscogee (Creek) Nation Marker looking east towards entrance.
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was flooded with a new wave of settlers. That same year, the Muscogee's old nemesis, Andrew Jackson, was elected president of the United States. Under pressure from Georgia and Alabama, Jackson implemented a policy of removal and during the 1830s, the Muscogee (Creek) Nation was forced to leave their ancestral lands in what became known as the “Trail of Tears.”
 
Erected 2016 by the City of Oxford.
 
Topics and series. This historical marker is listed in this topic list: Native Americans. In addition, it is included in the Former U.S. Presidents: #07 Andrew Jackson series list. A significant historical year for this entry is 1730.
 
Location. 33° 36.105′ N, 85° 47.396′ W. Marker is in Oxford, Alabama, in Calhoun County. Marker can be reached from Leon Smith Parkway. Located within Choccolocco Park. Touch for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 954 Leon Smith Parkway, Oxford AL 36203, United States of America. Touch for directions.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Prehistoric, Protohistoric & Historic Periods (within shouting distance of this marker); Welcome to the Choccolocco Park (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Muscogee (Creek) Nation (about 300 feet away); Mississippi Agriculture (about 400 feet away); Better Understandings, New Friendships
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(about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Muscogee (Creek) Nation (about 500 feet away); Mississippi Earthen Mounds (about 700 feet away); The Choccolocco Creek Archaeological Complex (about 700 feet away). Touch for a list and map of all markers in Oxford.
 
 
Credits. This page was last revised on January 31, 2020. It was originally submitted on January 31, 2020, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama. This page has been viewed 72 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on January 31, 2020, by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.

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Apr. 11, 2021